Coronavirus binding and core helix fusion simulated on supercomputer

Like the mythical Jacob's Ladder that reaches for the heavens, the coronavirus carries its own far-reaching molecular ladder-like apparatus. The coronavirus essentially builds a ladder to its host cell by piecing together ...

How Toxoplasma parasites glide so swiftly

If you're a cat owner, you might have heard of Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan that sometimes infects humans through contact with contaminated feces in litterboxes. Although harmless to most people, T. gondii can cause serious ...

Nanosponges could intercept SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection

Nanoparticles cloaked in human lung cell membranes and human immune cell membranes can attract and neutralize the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, causing the virus to lose its ability to hijack host cells and reproduce.

The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA

The most common organism in the oceans, and possibly on the entire planet, is a family of single-celled marine bacteria called SAR11. These drifting organisms look like tiny jelly beans and have evolved to outcompete other ...

Two bacteria allow spittlebugs to thrive on low-nutrient meals

A new study examines the symbiotic relationship between two types of bacteria and spittlebugs that helps the insect live on very low-nutrient food. The bacteria use a metabolic "trick" also employed by cancer cells to create ...

page 1 from 29

Host (biology)

In biology, a host is an organism that harbors a virus or parasite, or a mutual or commensal symbiont, typically providing nourishment and shelter. In botany, a host plant is one that supplies food resources and substrate for certain insects or other fauna. Examples of such interactions include a cell being host to a virus, a legume plant hosting helpful nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and animals as hosts to parasitic worms, e.g. nematodes.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA