Testing fluoride levels in Indian wells

In the hilly part of Central India, the Alirajpur and Jhabua districts in Madhya Pradesh are known for the high fluoride levels in their underground water. The government has done a great job of drilling and providing handpumps ...

Lithium fluoride crystals 'see' heavy ions with high energies

Lithium fluoride crystals have recently been used to register the tracks of nuclear particles. Physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow have just demonstrated that these ...

Producing F-18 radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging

Recently ANSTO researchers have made progress investigating improved ways to make life-saving radiopharmaceuticals using the fluorine-18 radioisotope so they can be available in more hospitals at lower cost.

Ferroelectric polymers made more versatile

The ferroelectric polymer PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) has interesting properties and could be used to store information or energy. One of the main drawbacks of PVDF is that extra functional groups added to improve certain ...

India's excess fluoride in groundwater

Fluoride occurs naturally in groundwater. In small amounts, this is usually not a problem, but in India the concentration in many places exceeds the threshold at which is starts to present a health hazard. According to estimates ...

Battery's hidden layer revealed

Commercially available since the 1970s, the lithium-ion battery is now the workhorse power source in many applications. It can be found in cell phones, laptops and electric vehicles. Yet, much about the basic science taking ...

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Fluoride

Fluoride is the anion F−, the reduced form of fluorine when as an ion and when bonded to another element. Both organofluorine compounds and inorganic fluorine containing compounds are called fluorides. Fluoride, like other halides, is a monovalent ion (−1 charge). Its compounds often have properties that are distinct relative to other halides. Structurally, and to some extent chemically, the fluoride ion resembles the hydroxide ion. Fluorine-containing compounds range from potent toxins such as sarin to life-saving pharmaceuticals such as efavirenz, and from inert materials such as carbon tetrafluoride to the highly reactive sulfur tetrafluoride. The range of fluorine-containing compounds is vast because fluorine is capable of forming compounds with all the elements except helium and neon.

Compounds containing fluoride anions and in many cases those containing covalent bonds to fluorine are called fluorides.

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