The Society for Neuroscience (SfN) formed in 1969, is a society of scientists and clinical physicians with a collaborative focus on the study and treatment of human brain and nervous system disorders. SfN has more than 36,000 members, publishes peer-review journals, newsletters, news stories for the Web and conducts educational symposiums.

Address
1121 14th Street, NW Suite 1010 Washington, DC 20005
Website
http://www.sfn.org/home.aspx
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Neuroscience

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Monkeys appreciate lifelike animation

Monkeys can overcome their aversion to animated monkeys through a more realistic avatar, according to research recently published in eNeuro.

Fish talk-os: Studying electrocommunication in the wild

A field study published in JNeurosci of tropical fish in Central America reveals how the animals use electric fields to communicate in their natural habitat to accomplish coordinated behaviors including mating and reproduction.

Neuropeptide controls roundworms' backward movement

A study of genetically diverse worms finds that the length of their backward movement is under the control of a small protein called a neuropeptide that fluctuates in response to food availability. The research, published ...

Video: Virtual predator makes decisions like the real one

A sea slug's decision to approach or avoid potential prey has been simulated in a virtual environment called Cyberslug. In the future the software, described in a paper published in eNeuro, may provide a foundation for the ...

Controlling fire ants with natural compounds

New research published in eNeuro has identified natural, plant-derived that repel fire ants. These compounds, including one found in cinnamon, work by activating a type of ion channel highly expressed in the antennae and ...

Same gene, different mating techniques in flies

A study of two related species of fruit fly published in JNeurosci reveals that a gene known to regulate behavior for attracting a mate in one species gives rise to unique wooing techniques observed in the other species.

How testosterone regulates singing in canaries

Testosterone controls specific features of birdsong in two distinct regions of the canary brain that resemble the human motor cortex, according to a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. The research points to a ...

Sexually naive male mice, fathers respond differently to pups

Sexually naïve male mice respond differently to the chemical signals emitted by newborn pups than males that have mated and lived with pregnant females, according to a study published March 20 in The Journal of Neuroscience. ...

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