New method for cell sorting utilizing microRNA switch and magnetic microbeads

New method for cell sorting utilizing microRNA switch and magnetic microbeads
Graphical abstract. Credit: Stem Cell Reports (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2022.05.003

The group led by Drs. Yoshinori Yoshida and Hirohide Saito succeeded in collecting and purifying large amounts of iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes rapidly with the technology they newly developed by combining a cell sorting method using microRNA and magnetic microbeads—the miR-switch-MACS.

The research group previously developed a technology, the microRNA (miRNA) switch, which is designed to suppress the expression of proteins encoded by artificial messenger RNA (mRNA) in response to miRNA in cells. (CiRA News: May 22, 2015). This technology made it possible to detect and sort and other cells not by surface receptors but by miRNAs. It is also a highly safe technique because there is no risk of damaging the genome, and the miRNA switches introduced into the cell only exist for a short period of time.

In this study, by combining the miRNA switch with a cell sorting method using magnetic microbeads (Magnetic-activated cell sorting; MACS), the research group succeeded in collecting and purifying large amounts of iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes in the order of hundreds of millions in a short time and with high purity (>97%). When the cardiomyocytes collected using the new technology, the miR-switch-MACS, were transplanted into with , the researchers found that the cells were engrafted in mouse hearts effectively, and their cardiac functions were improved.

Furthermore, the group also succeeded in purifying and collecting insulin-producing cells using the miR-switch-MACS. This method can be applied to a variety of cell types and is expected to supply large amounts of highly purified in a short period of time for cell transplantation therapy.

The results of this study were published online in Stem Cell Reports on June 10, 2022.


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More information: Yuta Tsujisaka et al, Purification of human iPSC-derived cells at large scale using microRNA switch and magnetic-activated cell sorting, Stem Cell Reports (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2022.05.003
Journal information: Stem Cell Reports

Provided by Kyoto University
Citation: New method for cell sorting utilizing microRNA switch and magnetic microbeads (2022, June 14) retrieved 15 August 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-06-method-cell-microrna-magnetic-microbeads.html
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