Habitable type planets found around nearby small mass star

exoplanets
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A team of researchers from several European countries and one from Chile has found evidence of three possibly habitable exoplanets circling the star GJ1061. In their paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, and soon to be published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, the group describes their study of the star system and what they found.

The closest star system to Earth is Proxima Centauri—it is approximately 4.2 light-years away. Prior research has shown that its volatility likely means its planets are not habitable. In this new effort, the researchers have been studying the star system GJ1061, which is the 20th-closest star system, approximately 17.5 light-years away. It is classified as a small, low-mass (M dwarf) star with low volatility, suggesting it might have . In this new effort, the researchers studied the path followed by GJ1061 to determine if it has planets, and whether such planets might be habitable.

In their study of the star, using data from the ESO in Chile, the researchers used the to detect the presence of planets. The technique involves looking at very small wobbles in a star's orbit, which indicate planetary gravity pulling on it. The researchers note that historically, the technique has only been used to detect large planets, but recent improvements have allowed for finding smaller ones as well.

The group reports that they found evidence of three planets and possibly a fourth circling GJ1061. All three of the were found to be slightly larger than Earth and all three orbit close to the star—each takes just days to make its way around. The researchers focused on one planet in particular, which they named planet d. They found it took only 13 days for it to make its way around its star. The researchers calculated that such a distance puts it in the Goldilocks zone. They also note that, unfortunately, M dwarf tend to have a volatile history. If planet d was blasted with radiation for millions of years, it is not likely suitable to harbor life now.


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More information: Red Dots: A temperate 1.5 Earth-mass planet in a compact multi-terrestrial planet system around GJ1061, arXiv:1908.04717 [astro-ph.EP] arxiv.org/abs/1908.04717

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Aug 23, 2019
The title screams:
Habitable type planets found....


This is fake news. For one, "habitable" is never defined. In order to properly use that word the environment would have to satisfy a huge number of conditions, of which none are given. The article concludes that actuall "it is not likely suitable to harbor life..."

Junk news.

Aug 23, 2019
This is fake news. For one, "habitable" is never defined. In order to properly use that word the environment would have to satisfy a huge number of conditions, of which none are given. The article concludes that actuall "it is not likely suitable to harbor life..."Junk news.


This is a fake comment. For one, they define habitable as being within the Goldilocks zone of the star. Pretty straight forward there. Furthermore, the article concludes that if the planet happened to be blasted by radiation for millions of years, it may not be suitable for life. Also, as you might notice in your quote, the word type was used as a qualifier, which suggests there's no certainty of habitability.

Junk comment.

Aug 23, 2019
GJ1061 is apparently a near-twin to tiny, dim Proxima Centauri, which means the potentially habitable zone is tucked in real-close to the star, at high risk from flare damage.
Still, following RECONS' re-survey in 1997, it is a dozen light-years nearer than previously thought...

Aug 23, 2019
GJ1061 is apparently a near-twin to tiny, dim Proxima Centauri, which means the potentially habitable zone is tucked in real-close to the star, at high risk from flare damage.
Still, following RECONS' re-survey in 1997, it is a dozen light-years nearer than previously thought...


Agreed. The "goldilocks zone" isn't as safe as one might think. Close to the edge of that zone that is nearest to the Star is too close for comfort. In any case, humans will not be able to colonise such planets for a very long time, if ever.
It is never spoken of, but for humans to 'go to the Stars' to colonise the appropriate planets, the human body wlll have to be modified to the extent that it is impervious to radiations and velocities that must be encountered in outer space.
The human body is too delicate for the rigours of space travel and the velocities that are required for reaching those planets within a human lifetime. It is within the reach of human researchers to 'mechanise' the body.

Aug 23, 2019
Nearby? Well let's go! What are we waiting on?

Aug 23, 2019
Errr, the twentieth nearest star isn't just beyond Pluto, and we can't even design a mission to Mars that can guarantee safe return.

Star Trek has corrupted the minds of a generation.

Aug 23, 2019
Errr, the twentieth nearest star isn't just beyond Pluto, and we can't even design a mission to Mars that can guarantee safe return.

Star Trek has corrupted the minds of a generation.


Give me NERVA and we'll go to Mars and back, again and again and again

Aug 23, 2019
Editorial Note: Gliese 1061 is 12 light years away, not 17.5.

And not to be confused with Wolf 1061 which also has a multi-planet system and nearby at 14 light-years away.

Aug 23, 2019
lets all take up a collection to buy shoofly a ticket to Mars
here's my two cents worth!
send the mental wasteland to
contaminate the rusty wasteland
good riddance...

though it would be an interesting experiment to perform on the useless twat
to see which variety of radiation makes him glow brighter?
cosmic radiation
solar gamma radiation
or leakage of various ionizing radiation from the reactor?


Aug 24, 2019
DS "Errr, the twentieth nearest star isn't just beyond Pluto, and we can't even design a mission to Mars that can guarantee safe return. Star Trek has corrupted the minds of a generation."

All too true. Back in the '90s, after pointing out this very problem at an Eastercon 'writing group', I was nearly lynched due my 'negativity'.
FWIW, one of us amateur authors had devised a novel, technically plausible solution, which I duly praised, but I lost the details during my escape...

Aug 24, 2019
Errr, the twentieth nearest star isn't just beyond Pluto, and we can't even design a mission to Mars that can guarantee safe return.

Star Trek has corrupted the minds of a generation.
says Schneib

But the scientific potentialities of the Star Trek series did give scientists some very good ideas to pursue. And it has been fun watching.

And, as I've said elsewhere, the human body would have to be modified to withstand the rigours of space travel and be able to deflect somehow the effects of solar and cosmic radiations on the cells and every inch of the human body. Astronauts will need such modifications if they are to live in space beyond LEO. Otherwise,, they will suffer from malformations and other health problems.

Aug 24, 2019
As has been proven by astronauts living on the ISS for an extended duration, the weightlessness takes its toll on muscles and bones and is somewhat debilitating when they come back to Earth after that extended stay. Such a long stay on the surface of the Moon would probably result in the same physical infirmities upon returning to Earth.

So, physical modifications seem to be in order if humans are to be able to move off the Earth to colonise another exoplanet. Perhaps NASA, ESA and the Japanese space agency could get into the medical field to see how it could be done.

Aug 25, 2019
FWIW, one of us amateur authors had devised a novel, technically plausible solution, which I duly praised, but I lost the details during my escape...


Realistically we don't know if we can travel to the stars - already Fermi pointed out that in his solution (not "paradox") of the old question "where are they".

If we look at migration it is possible if we can reach the Oort cloud resources which is the large distance on an exponential scale, as large as the Moon landings were [ref: xqcd distance cartoon]. But hollowing out comets and make generation ships will also mean abandoning the idea that a species travel, we will split into as many species branches.

Same goes for the only practical solution I know of, an Orion drive (nuke pulses). It will get to 2 % of ultimate speed limit IIRC, so a generational time scale travel - crap ideas. As opposed to the Oort cloud resource exploitation effort it cannot pay back Earth. (Oort clouders can send harvested material for pickup.)

Aug 25, 2019
- ctd -

Even the later colonization of Americas - way after indigenous populations did it - relied on paying back, not paying forward. So, historically at least, migrations while living off the land possibly, not blind colonization that costs the source dearly.

Aug 25, 2019
Hm. Better " 'colonization' of Americas" then. Especially since I framed it in history ...

Aug 25, 2019
& after colonization?
did the new resources &
industrial advancements
solve the problems of the "Old World"
or add to them?

Aug 25, 2019
But the scientific potentialities of the Star Trek series did give scientists some very good ideas to pursue. And it has been fun watching.

And, as I've said elsewhere, the human body would have to be modified to withstand the rigours of space travel and be able to deflect somehow the effects of solar and cosmic radiations on the cells and every inch of the human body. Astronauts will need such modifications if they are to live in space beyond LEO. Otherwise,, they will suffer from malformations and other health problems.
Tardigrades are unique in their radiation resistance, which is due to a couple of special proteins which are not found in any other species. They might provide the solution, or the hint to one. It is not just radiation resistance that's required though. If space travel at a significant fraction of the speed of light is never achieved space travel will be *long*. So astronauts will need to be put under deep "sleep". Will that be possible?

Aug 26, 2019
Sahstar, please link your sources for research supporting your claim pf tardigrade resistance to radiation

& what about vacuum desiccation of the ha adult, molted stages?

because, to my limited knowledge, tardigrade resistance to radiation is specific to when they are spores?

Mythbusters did a study where the big winner among the various bugs they tested?

were Tribolium castaneum = flour beetles (barely)
surviving exposure to 100 thousand roentgens of radiation

that explains why their body parts are ubiquitous in all baked goods & beer/alcohol mash

Sep 14, 2019
Mythbusters did a study where the big winner among the various bugs they tested?

were Tribolium castaneum = flour beetles (barely)
surviving exposure to 100 thousand roentgens of radiation

that explains why their body parts are ubiquitous in all baked goods & beer/alcohol mash

What doesn't kill'ya, only makes you stronger. mmMMM....beer.

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