Two planets orbiting Teegarden's star described as most earthlike found yet

Earth planet
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A pair of researchers, one with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the other Tel Aviv University, has found evidence that suggests two of Teegarden's star planets are the most Earth-like found yet. In their paper published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Amri Wandel and Lev Tal-Or describe their study of the two exoplanets and what they found.

Back in 2003, astrophysicist Bonnard Teegarden led a team that discovered what is now known as Teegarden's star—a red M approximately 12.5 light-years away. Since that time, space scientists have studied both the star and the that make up its star system. In this new effort, the researchers focused their efforts on two of those exoplanets, which are called Teegarden's star b and c—both were first detected this past June by a team working on the CARMENES survey.

The work by Wandel and Tal-Or was focused on learning more about the habitability of the two exoplanets. As part of that effort, they noted that both are relatively close to their star, with orbits of just 4.9 and 11.4 days, putting them both firmly in the Goldilocks zone. They note that both are tidally locked, which means one side always faces the sun, which also means they have no day/night cycle.

The researchers acknowledge that it is not known what sort of atmospheres the two planets have, but suggest it is likely either or both could support water. This is because they are tidally locked, which means that even a thin atmosphere would be enough to spread the warmth and cold across the dark/light dividing line. They calculated that atmospheres between one-third that of Earth's or as much as 17 times as dense would allow for to exist on the surface of either planet. They also note that both of the planets are near in size to Earth. And as part of applying an analytic habitability model to the planets, the researchers calculated that Teegarden b has a 60 percent chance of having surface temperatures between zero and 50 degrees C—Teegarden c was found to be colder, much more like Mars. The researchers conclude that conditions in the transition zone appear to be favorable for supporting life.


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New Earth-like exoplanets discovered around red dwarf Teegarden star

More information: Amri Wandel et al. On the Habitability of Teegarden's Star Planets, The Astrophysical Journal (2019). DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ab2df7

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Aug 08, 2019
I'm looking for one or more planets as my next vacation home, that are not tidally locked, have a good rotation and orbital cycle, a decent magnetic field, plenty of H20, not too much volcanic activity or continental shifting, and is in the Goldilocks zone. Where could I find such a possible paradise?

Aug 08, 2019
Teegarden sounds like where you might find the restaurant at the end of the universe.
And it's a red dwarf !
And Lev Tal-Or sounds like he could be from Krypton.

Aug 08, 2019
I have to wonder if we really know what the transition zone on a tidally-locked planet would be like. It is SO different from conditions on Earth, can we be sure our models and calculations are correct? Also, what about the gravitational and centripetal effects of being so close to the sun and having such a short orbital period? We haven't observed any planets like that up close. Definitely worth more study!

Aug 08, 2019
I have to wonder if we really know what the transition zone on a tidally-locked planet would be like.


Cities of eternal twilight. Pretty sure I read a couple sci-fi books theorizing on the topic. But I feel personally that it would be very stormy. The hot side would always be evaporating water and the dark side would always be cooling it and in the middle the hot and cool pressure zones would be slamming together into probably wicked thunderstorms and maybe tornadoes/hurricanes. I feel like there would be a band of clouds around the day/night border at all times. That would look pretty neat from satellite. It would also maybe warm/cool the areas near the border of the sunless zone so that the habitability is increased a bit either way.

Aug 08, 2019
I wonder if OuMuaMua is headed towards Teergarden's star, at yet another 60 degree angle relative to the star's velocity, to line up another near perfect gravity assist?

Aug 09, 2019
I wonder if OuMuaMua is headed towards Teergarden's star, at yet another 60 degree angle relative to the star's velocity, to line up another near perfect gravity assist?
The object is now heading away from the Sun towards Pegasus towards a vanishing point 66° from the direction of its approach, (note: according to the formula: 2 θ ∞ = 2 cos − 1 ⁡ ( − 1 / e ) ) Ref: Oumuamua

Aug 09, 2019
I'm looking for one or more planets as my next vacation home, that are not tidally locked, have a good rotation and orbital cycle, a decent magnetic field, plenty of H20, not too much volcanic activity or continental shifting, and is in the Goldilocks zone. Where could I find such a possible paradise?

H_20, is this some kind of a new super hydrogen molecule? Bad jokes aside, it gets me when people write H20 instead of H2O. Specially, if the writer actually knows the difference between them like in this case.

Aug 09, 2019
H_20, is this some kind of a new super hydrogen molecule? Bad jokes aside, it gets me when people write H20 instead of H2O. Specially, if the writer actually knows the difference between them like in this case.
Actually, it's HOH ... hydrogen hydroxide ... fascinating molecule

Aug 09, 2019
Ah, dihydrogen monoxide, pretty but dangerous (blue tinted liquid which removes air from your lungs - a substance responsible for many deaths on Earth :-) ).

I have to wonder if we really know what the transition zone on a tidally-locked planet would be like. It is SO different from conditions on Earth, can we be sure our models and calculations are correct?


No, but they are getting better, as computers gets more coverage and the reference data from planets in our system (mostly Earth, of course) too. The last couple of papers on tidal locks show how reasonably dense atmospheres moves heat to the backside - a superEarth analogous to Earth would have much the same temperatures everywhere (c.f. Venus for an extreme comparison).

Aug 09, 2019
I'm looking for one or more planets as my next vacation home, that are not tidally locked, have a good rotation and orbital cycle, a decent magnetic field, plenty of H20, not too much volcanic activity or continental shifting, and is in the Goldilocks zone. Where could I find such a possible paradise?

At the rate you are denying human induced climate change, You better find one fast.

Aug 09, 2019
I'm looking for one or more planets as my next vacation home, that are not tidally locked, have a good rotation and orbital cycle, a decent magnetic field, plenty of H20, not too much volcanic activity or continental shifting, and is in the Goldilocks zone. Where could I find such a possible paradise?

H_20, is this some kind of a new super hydrogen molecule? Bad jokes aside, it gets me when people write H20 instead of H2O. Specially, if the writer actually knows the difference between them like in this case.
says Cortezz

What's with the 'underscore in H_20, (which is not what was typed). I believe that anyone who read my comment who has even half of a brain would have understood that the numeral 0 used instead of the letter O had to have been a slip of my human host's digit. The numeral 0 is just above the letter O on the keyboard.
The volatility of liquid water is essential for my new planetary vacation home.

Aug 09, 2019
I have to wonder if we really know what the transition zone on a tidally-locked planet would be like.


Cities of eternal twilight. Pretty sure I read a couple sci-fi books theorizing on the topic. But I feel personally that it would be very stormy. The hot side would always be evaporating water and the dark side would always be cooling it and in the middle the hot and cool pressure zones would be slamming together into probably wicked thunderstorms and maybe tornadoes/hurricanes. I feel like there would be a band of clouds around the day/night border at all times. That would look pretty neat from satellite. It would also maybe warm/cool the areas near the border of the sunless zone so that the habitability is increased a bit either way.
says SciTechDude

There would also be the possibility of living underground ~1/2 mile, with the added convenience of an extensive HVAC system where the residents eventually evolve into Morlocks. (see H.G.Wells' "The Time Machine")

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