The Astrophysical Journal is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering astronomy and astrophysics. It was founded in 1895 by the American astronomers George Ellery Hale and James Edward Keeler. It publishes three 500-page issues per month. Since 1953, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series has been published in conjunction with The Astrophysical Journal. It aims to supplement the material in the journal. It publishes six volumes per year, with two 280-page issues per volume. The journal and the supplement series were both published by the University of Chicago Press for the American Astronomical Society. In January 2009 publication was transferred to Institute of Physics Publishing, following the move of the society s Astronomical Journal in 2008. The reason for the changes were given by the Society as the increasing financial demands of the Press. The Astrophysical Journal Letters is another section of The Astrophysical Journal intended to publish rapid communications.

Publisher
Institute of Physics Publishing
Country
United States
History
1895–present
Website
http://iopscience.org/apj
Impact factor
6.063 (Journal)
5.158 (Letters)
15.206 (Supplement) (2010)

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Black hole fails to do its job

Astronomers have discovered what can happen when a giant black hole does not intervene in the life of a galaxy cluster. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes they have shown that passive black hole behavior ...

Dead star emits never-before seen mix of radiation

A global collaboration of telescopes including ESA's Integral high-energy space observatory has detected a unique mix of radiation bursting from a dead star in our galaxy—something that has never been seen before in this ...

First image of a multi-planet system around a sun-like star

The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) has taken the first ever image of a young, sun-like star accompanied by two giant exoplanets. Images of systems with multiple exoplanets are extremely rare, ...

Could mini-Neptunes be irradiated ocean planets?

Many exoplanets known today are 'super-Earths,' with a radius 1.3 times that of Earth, and 'mini-Neptunes,' with 2.4 Earth radii. Mini-Neptunes, which are less dense, were long thought to be gas planets, made up of hydrogen ...

Separating gamma-ray bursts

By applying a machine-learning algorithm, scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have developed a method to classify all gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), rapid highly energetic explosions in distant galaxies, ...

Runaway star might explain black hole's disappearing act

At the center of a far-off galaxy, a black hole is slowly consuming a disk of gas that swirls around it like water circling a drain. As a steady trickle of gas is pulled into the gaping maw, ultrahot particles gather close ...

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