Image: Hubble sees a galaxy bucking the trend

Hubble sees a galaxy bucking the trend
This luminous orb is the galaxy NGC 4621, better known as Messier 59. As this latter moniker indicates, the galaxy is listed in the famous catalog of deep-sky objects compiled by French comet-hunter Charles Messier in the 18th century. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, P. Cote

This luminous orb is the galaxy NGC 4621, better known as Messier 59. As this latter moniker indicates, the galaxy is listed in the famous catalog of deep-sky objects compiled by French comet-hunter Charles Messier in the 18th century. However, German astronomer Johann Gottfried Koehler is credited with discovering the galaxy just days before Messier added it to his collection in 1779.

Modern observations show that Messier 59 is an , one of the three main kinds of galaxies along with spirals and irregulars. Ellipticals tend to be the most evolved of the trio, full of old, red stars and exhibiting little or no new star formation. Messier 59, however, bucks this trend somewhat; the galaxy does show signs of star formation, with some newborn residing within a disk near the core.

Located in the 2,000-strong Virgo cluster of within the constellation of Virgo (the Virgin), Messier 59 lies approximately 50 million light-years away from us. This image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys.


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Citation: Image: Hubble sees a galaxy bucking the trend (2019, May 31) retrieved 20 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-image-hubble-galaxy-bucking-trend.html
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May 31, 2019
yep, unique.
yep, Stupid Design.
In this busy Cosmos, every galaxy has it's own story to tell.

It will be interesting to learn of the events causing these specific unusual star formation activity.

Speculating here. That maybe such events happen more often than we yet realize?
But very slowly & very disorganized minimal scale. Spread across tens of billions of years.

Perhaps eventually, this "old" galaxy will get dragged into another?
Resulting in recycling the cold, dead bones into new stars?

Which brings up the subject.
Classifying these as "o;d" stars is a misnomer, in my opinion.
Sure they gave up a lot of mass in a series of nova & supernova & even hypernova.

Yet we scale many of these "productive" stars as just millions of years old.
Rate of KA-BOOMS! are by how massive the young stars were.

Makes me kinda skeptical of how reliable our methodology is?

Who would decide how to correctly classify by age?

Cause so much "old" obsolete data &mistakess seem to live on


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