Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

February 16, 2019
The discovery was made on the Mata Indio dig site in the northern Lambayeque region

Peruvian archaeologists discovered an Incan tomb in the north of the country where an elite member of the pre-Columbian empire was buried, one of the investigators announced Friday.

The discovery was made on the Mata Indio dig site in the northern Lambayeque region, archaeologist Luis Chero told state news agency Andina.

Archaeologists believe the tomb belonged to a noble Inca based on the presence of "spondylus," a type of sea shell always present in the graves of important figures from the Incan period, which lasted from the 12th to the 16th centuries.

The tomb had been broken into multiple times, possibly in search of treasure. But despite evidence of looting, recovered items including vases.

The tomb also had unique architecture including hollows for the placement of idols.

Chero said the findings "demonstrate the majesty and importance of this site," located 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) north of the capital Lima, and 2,000 kilometers from Cusco—capital of the Inca empire which stretched from southern Colombia to central Chile.

The tomb had been broken into multiple times, possibly in search of treasure

Explore further: Peru discovers in pre-Incan site tomb of 16 Chinese migrants

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Shootist
1.7 / 5 (6) Feb 16, 2019
Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru


Iron found in iron ore.
Bart_A
1 / 5 (1) Feb 19, 2019
This article is listed at the top of phys.org home page in the "Popular" column, having received a total of 1 comment, and less shares than many other recent articles. Someone has screwed up the algorithm.

BTW, it really isn't a very exciting article. The Inca empire was based in Peru, and there have been many discoveries there already. Why the hoopla over 1 more tomb?

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