Peru discovers in pre-Incan site tomb of 16 Chinese migrants

August 24, 2017
The remains of one of the recently discovered 19th century Chinese immigrants lies at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

Peruvian archeologists have discovered in a sacred pre-Incan site the bodies of 16 men from China who arrived to South America almost two centuries ago as semi-enslaved workers.

The secret tomb in Lima is the biggest burial site of Chinese migrants ever found in Peru and was presented Thursday to journalists. Found alongside the bony remains were opium pipes and other personal objects used by the migrants.

As many as 100,000 Chinese migrants arrived to Peru in the second half of the and for little pay performed back-breaking work on farms, building railroads and removing guano, which is bird excrement coveted as fertilizer.

The Chinese were discriminated against even in death, having to be buried in the pre-Incan sites after being barred from cemeteries reserved for Roman Catholics.

Archeologists work at the site where 16 tombs belonging to 19th century Chinese immigrants were discovered, at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

An archeologist works at the site where 16 tombs belonging to 19th century Chinese immigrants were discovered, at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
Archeologists work at the site where 16 tombs belonging to 19th century Chinese immigrants were discovered, at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
An archeologist works at the site where 16 tombs belonging to 19th century Chinese immigrants were discovered, at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
Archeologists work at the site where 16 tombs belonging to 19th century Chinese immigrants were discovered, at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
An opium pipe sits next to the remains of one of the 19th century Chinese immigrants recently discovered at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
An archeologist works at the site where 16 tombs belonging to 19th century Chinese immigrants were discovered, at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
An archeologist works at the site where 16 tombs belonging to 19th century Chinese immigrants were discovered, at Huaca Bellavista in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2107. According to the Ministry of Culture of Peru, the tombs where located in a pre-Inca sacred site because Chinese immigrants could not be buried in the Catholic cemeteries of the time. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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carriosity
1 / 5 (3) Aug 24, 2017
Just to clarify...guano is not bird excrement. It is the feces of bats.
ThomasQuinn
5 / 5 (2) Aug 25, 2017
Just to clarify...guano is not bird excrement. It is the feces of bats.


guano
noun gua·no \ˈgwä-(ˌ)nĹŤ\

a fertilizer containing the accumulated excrement of seabirds or bats; broadly : excrement especially of seabirds or bats

First Known Use: 1604

https://www.merri...ry/guano
Steelwolf
5 / 5 (2) Aug 25, 2017
Guano in caves would be primarily from bats, however there were many island and cliff nesting areas where birds had been for centuries with their leavings getting to be masses of guano covering whole islands to the depth of several feet. This was used not only for fertillizer, but also for the nitre for the making of gunpowder, thus it was highly prized.
Nik_2213
not rated yet Aug 25, 2017
Just for a moment, I thought this was reporting pre-Columbian contact.
Oh, the poor folk, treated so shabbily...
rrrander
1 / 5 (3) Aug 26, 2017
Chinese are always leaving China in droves. Canada has taken in over 500,000 in the last 10 years. The place (China) is a polluted, overcrowded cesspit. No wonder they want out.
Shootist
1 / 5 (1) Aug 27, 2017
Bat guano, bird guano, it's all algore to me.

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