Video: How baby aspirin saves lives

January 3, 2019, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

Low-dose "baby" aspirin is rarely given to children anymore.

Instead, people at risk of a may take a daily aspirin to decrease their risk.

In this video, Reactions explains how works to inhibit blood clotting and help prevent heart attacks:

Explore further: Quitting daily aspirin therapy may increase second heart attack, stroke risk

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BendBob
not rated yet Jan 03, 2019
Write the explanations, I don't want to watch videos. It is so much easier re-read then backup to find the part, I want to re-read again. And sometimes I need to read slower than the videos to get a better understanding.

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