Suomi NPP satellite find Typhoon Shanshan near Japan's coast

August 8, 2018, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
On Aug. 8 at 0318 UTC (Aug. 7 at 11:18 p.m. EDT) the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Shanshan near Japan. Credit: NOAA/NASA/NRL

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite caught up with Typhoon Shanahan and provided forecasters with a visible picture of the storm on Aug. 8. The satellite image revealed the storm still maintained an eye, although now cloud-filled.

On August 8 at 0318 UTC (Aug. 7 at 11:18 p.m. EDT) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured visible image of Shanshan nearing Tokyo, Japan. The VIIRS image showed that Shanshan had powerful thunderstorms surrounding the center of circulation and in a large band of thunderstorms wrapping around the .

On August 8 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that Typhoon Shanshan was located near 34.5 degrees north latitude and 141.3 degrees east longitude, about 92 nautical miles east-southeast of Yokosuka, Japan. Shanshan had maintained maximum sustained winds near 70 knots (80.5 mph/129.6 kph) but is on a weakening trend.

The JTWC expect Shanshan's western quadrant to affect Tokyo while the center of circulation stays off-shore. Then Shanshan is forecast to curve northeast and move away from the Big Island.

Explore further: Typhoon Shanshan caught by NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite

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