New findings on intercellular communication

July 20, 2018, Université libre de Bruxelles

Led by Benoit Vanhollebeke, WELBIO investigator at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), the Laboratory of Neurovascular Signaling has solved an important enigma of cell signaling related to Wnt signaling specificity.

Wnt is ancient pathway, whose evolutionary appearance dates back to the emergence of multicellular animals. It plays pivotal roles in cell to cell communication and governs several aspects of embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. When dysfunctional, Wnt signaling can be at the origin of many diseases, in particular several cancers. With 10 receptors and 19 ligands, recognizing each other, the complexity of the pathway seemed dizzying. How do vertebrate cells manage to interpret the many Wnt signals they encounter and trigger an adequate response? It is such an interpretation mechanism that ULB researchers have just discovered.

Previous findings had shown that two proteins expressed by cerebral endothelial , Gpr124 and Reck, are required for cerebrovascular development in response Wnt7 ligands. The team went on to study the mechanism by which the complex operates. Using genetic, biophysical and zebrafish experiments, researchers have shown that the complex Gpr124 / Reck acts as a decoding module: Reck recognizes the Wnt7 , but the presence of Gpr124 is necessary to trigger Wnt7 signaling via Frizzled receptors. Their results are detailed in Science.

These discoveries will enable researchers to refine their understanding of Wnt signaling and its multiple regulations. This would also make it possible to consider new treatments for diseases, such as cancers or neurovascular diseases.

Explore further: Synthetic receptors can rewire cell functions and minimize side-effects

More information: Marie Eubelen et al. A molecular mechanism for Wnt ligand-specific signaling, Science (2018). DOI: 10.1126/science.aat1178

Related Stories

A dictionary of the language of cells

July 22, 2015

In their struggle to survive and prosper, multicellular organisms rely on a complex network of communication between cells, which in humans are believed to number about 40 trillion. Now, in a study published in Nature Communications, ...

Signaling pathways to the nucleus

March 19, 2018

A team of researchers from the University of Freiburg have discovered how the plant hormone auxin is transported within cells and how this signaling pathway helps to control gene expression in the nucleus. Auxin regulates ...

Recommended for you

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.