Image: Gullies of Matara Crater

April 6, 2018, NASA
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Gullies on Martian sand dunes, like these in Matara Crater, have been very active, with many flows in the last 10 years. The flows typically occur when seasonal frost is present.

In this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter we see frost in and around two gullies, which have both been active before. (View this observation to see what these looked like in 2010.) There are no fresh flows so far this year, but HiRISE will keep watching.

The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per . [The original image scale is 50.3 centimeters (19.8 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 151 centimeters (59.4 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.

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Sherrin
not rated yet Apr 07, 2018
Doesn't look like any map I've ever seen. You firstly describe it as an image ("In this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter we see frost in and around two gullies") then you describe it as a map "projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel."

Unlike any map, your reader is unable to count (let alone distinguish) individual pixels, rendering it useless as a map in determining scale. Therefore ... it surely is an image. And a very beautiful image at that. Brilliant imagery that continues to flow from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
jonesdave
1 / 5 (3) Apr 07, 2018
Firstly, the wording comes from the original NASA release, here:
https://www.nasa....a-crater
This in turn comes from the University of Arizona release, here:
https://www.uahir...026_1300

Secondly, by downloading the original image, we can see that it is 2880 x 1800 pixels. For me, that gives an image covering ~ 1440m x 900m.

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