Image: Mysterious South Pole formation on Mars

June 5, 2017, NASA
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show it is late summer in the Southern hemisphere, so the Sun is low in the sky and subtle topography is accentuated in orbital images.

We see many shallow pits in the bright residual cap of carbon dioxide ice (also called "Swiss cheese terrain"). There is also a deeper, circular formation that penetrates through the ice and dust. This might be an or it could be a collapse pit.

The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 49.7 centimeters (19.6 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 149 centimeters (67.3 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.

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Osiris1
not rated yet Jun 05, 2017
Odd, an inverse circular frustrum of a cone with a flat bottom parallel to the surface. What is the odds of that occurring in the real world and at the south pole of anything.... Especially with NO ice around it. Maybe something underneath the 'hatch' that is warmer?? C'mon trolls, have fun.
geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Jun 05, 2017
Aliens, obviously.

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