Image: Frosted dunes on Mars

June 8, 2016 by Alfred Mcewen, NASA
Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Sand dunes cover much of this terrain, which has large boulders lying on flat areas between the dunes.

It is late winter in the southern hemisphere of Mars, and these dunes are just getting enough sunlight to start defrosting their seasonal cover of .

Spots form where pressurized carbon dioxide gas escapes to the surface. 

This image was taken on March 27, 2016, at 15:31 local Mars time by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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