Image: Eroded Layers in Shalbatana Valles

January 30, 2018, NASA
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Layers, probably sedimentary in origin, have undergone extensive erosion in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) of Shalbatana Valles, a prominent channel that cuts through Xanthe Terra.

This erosion has produced several small mesas and exposed light-toned material that may differ in composition from the surrounding material.

The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 27.5 centimeters (10.8 inches) per (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 82 centimeters (32.3 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.

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