Image: Mount Sharp 'photobombs' Mars Curiosity rover

February 1, 2018, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
This self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle on Vera Rubin Ridge, which it's been investigating for the past several months. Poking up just behind Curiosity's mast is Mount Sharp, photobombing the robot's selfie. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

A new self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle on Vera Rubin Ridge, which it has been investigating for the past several months. Directly behind the rover is the start of a clay-rich slope scientists are eager to begin exploring. In coming weeks, Curiosity will begin to climb this slope. In the image, north is on the left and west is on the right, with Gale Crater's rim on the horizon of both edges.

Poking up just behind Curiosity's mast is Mount Sharp, photobombing the robot's selfie. When Curiosity landed on Mars five years ago, the team's intention was to study lower Mount Sharp, where the rover will remain for all of its time on Mars. The mountain's base provides access to layers formed over millions of years. These layers formed in the presence of water—likely due to a lake or lakes where sediments accumulated, which formed these layers inside Gale Crater.

The mosaic was assembled from dozens of images taken by Curiosity's Mars Hands Lens Imager (MAHLI). They were all taken on Jan. 23, 2018, during Sol 1943.

For news about other Mars missions this month, view the first episode of a new video series, "The Mars Report."

In this first episode of The Mars Report we celebrate the 14th anniversary of the Opportunity rover; show you a recent panoramic view from the Curiosity rover; and recap a "cool" discovery of ice deposits spotted by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Also, we look forward to the InSight lander, heading to the Red Planet in May 2018. Credit: Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Explore further: Image: NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter views rover climbing Mount Sharp

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Caliban
1 / 5 (1) Feb 01, 2018
In the image, north is on the left and west is on the right, with Gale Crater's rim on the horizon of both edges.


Uh....is that even possible, in geodesic terms? Or even photomosaic ones?
RNP
1 / 5 (2) Feb 02, 2018
Withdrawn
Guy_Underbridge
not rated yet Feb 02, 2018
north is on the left and west is on the right
If I stand on my head, I can do it.
Ojorf
1 / 5 (3) Feb 02, 2018
What about all the holes in the wheels?
They look damaged, are they?
How did that happen?
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Feb 02, 2018
What about all the holes in the wheels?
They look damaged, are they?
How did that happen?
I dunno instead of asking people here to work Google for you, why don't you do it yourself?
Ojorf
1.8 / 5 (4) Feb 02, 2018
OK, thanks for the informative reply.
Ebo2
5 / 5 (2) Feb 02, 2018
@Caliban & Guy_
You probably figured it out, but it's a wide-angle shot so: it starts at North on the left sweeps through East and south to end up at West on the right.
TechnoCreed
5 / 5 (1) Feb 02, 2018
Here is an excellent article explaining how this incredible trick is done http://www.planet...pan.html

Edit play with Roundme it is fantastic.

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