Daimler struggling with European emissions standards

January 16, 2018
Dieter Zetsche, chairman of the management board of Daimler, says his company is struggling to meet tightened European emissions standards

The chief executive of Daimler said Monday at the Detroit auto show that his company cannot currently guarantee it can meet tougher European CO2 emissions standards taking effect in several years.

Dieter Zetsche, CEO of the maker of Mercedes-Benz luxury vehicles, told reporters he "can't guarantee" to meet tightening in 2021.

"It's a huge challenge for everyone," he told AFP later in an interview. "We will make it. That's our intention. But I can't guarantee it."

A regulation adopted in 2014 requires manufacturers selling vehicles in the European Union to reach, with some exceptions, a level of 95 grams of CO2 emitted per kilometer by early 2021, compared to 130 grams in 2015.

Manufacturers that fail will be fined 95 euros per car and gram of excess CO2. This could potentially lead to fines in the tens or hundreds of millions of euros.

Fellow automotive CEO Sergio Marchionne of Fiat Chrysler said he understood Daimler's predicament, and his company was also looking at how to meet the tougher standards—with non-compliance not an option.

"We've gone through this. It ain't pretty," he said, regarding the cost of fines.

"Having said this, we have no intention of pulling vehicles, because we think we can meet the standards."

German manufacturers, whose large engines emit more CO2 than smaller models, are struggling to achieve the goals, according to experts.

So far, they have relied on to reduce emissions. But diesel engine cars have fallen out of favor with consumers and sales have dropped, exacerbated by the Volkswagen diesel emissions cheating scandal.

"It's dragged all of us into the very uncomfortable state where we are now on the defensive continuously about the utilization of diesel in the market," Marchionne said.

To help comply with the new standards, manufacturers are developing a range of electric vehicles, with no certainty about the real-world demand from consumers.

Explore further: CEO: Mercedes may miss emission goal if electrics don't sell

Related Stories

Frankfurt auto show: Diesels improve, but will people buy?

September 13, 2017

German automakers say they have new and improved diesels that meet or beat ever-tightening emissions standards. But will consumers buy them the way they used to in the wake of the Volkswagen scandal and threats of diesel ...

Recommended for you

Permanent, wireless self-charging system using NIR band

October 8, 2018

As wearable devices are emerging, there are numerous studies on wireless charging systems. Here, a KAIST research team has developed a permanent, wireless self-charging platform for low-power wearable electronics by converting ...

Facebook launches AI video-calling device 'Portal'

October 8, 2018

Facebook on Monday launched a range of AI-powered video-calling devices, a strategic revolution for the social network giant which is aiming for a slice of the smart speaker market that is currently dominated by Amazon and ...

Artificial enzymes convert solar energy into hydrogen gas

October 4, 2018

In a new scientific article, researchers at Uppsala University describe how, using a completely new method, they have synthesised an artificial enzyme that functions in the metabolism of living cells. These enzymes can utilize ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.