NASA sees Ockhi strengthening off southwestern coast of India

December 1, 2017, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Ockhi on Nov. 30 at 3:17 p.m. EST (20:17 UTC) and showed coldest cloud tops and strongest storms (purple) were just off the southwestern coast of India. Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ockhi, it measured cloud top temperatures that showed strongest storms were off the coast of southwestern India. Infrared data showed Ockhi intensifing into a typhoon.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Ockhi on Nov. 30 at 3:17 p.m. EST (20:17 UTC) and showed coldest cloud tops and strongest storms were just off the southwestern coast of India.

Those cloud top temperatures were as cold as minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 53 degrees Celsius). Storms with cloud top temperatures that cold have the capability to produce heavy rainfall. Hours after Aqua passed overhead, Ockhi strengthened from a to hurricane-force.

On Dec. 1 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC) the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Ockhi had become a typhoon. Maximum sustained winds were near 80 knots. Ockhi was centered near 9.1 degrees north latitude and 72.3 degrees east longitude. That's about 960 nautical miles north of Diego Garcia. Ockhi was speeding to the west at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center said "by 48 hours (Dec 3 at 10 a.m. EST/1500 UTC), Ockhi will begin to interact with a trough (elongated area of low pressure) and begin to track northeastward. Ockhi will begin extratropical transition as it tracks northeastward and will become extratropical as it makes landfall over northwest India."

Explore further: Suomi NPP catches birth of northern Indian Ocean Tropical Cyclone Ockhi

Related Stories

NASA sees Sanvu strengthen to a tropical storm

August 29, 2017

Tropical Depression Sanvu has strengthened into a tropical storm in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the storm's cloud tops using infrared light.

Recommended for you

Corals light the way to a healthy partnership

January 22, 2019

Corals know how to attract good company. New research finds that corals emit an enticing fluorescent green light that attracts the mobile microalgae, known as Symbiodinium, that are critical to the establishment of a healthy ...

For zombie microbes, deep-sea buffet is just out of reach

January 22, 2019

Far below the ocean floor, sediments are teeming with bizarre zombie-like microbes. Although they're technically alive, they grow in slow motion, and can take decades for a single cell to divide—something their cousins ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.