Image: Soaring over Jupiter

September 25, 2017, NASA
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt

This striking image of Jupiter was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft as it performed its eighth flyby of the gas giant planet.

The image was taken on Sept. 1, 2017 at 2:58 p.m. PDT (5:58 p.m. EDT). At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was 4,707 miles (7,576 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of about -17.4 degrees.

Citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. Points of interest are "Whale's Tail" and "Dan's Spot."

Explore further: Image: Jupiter—a new point of view

More information: JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam

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