New gravitational wave data analysis now underway

September 21, 2017, Pennsylvania State University
New gravitational wave data analysis now underway
Before the Merge: Spiraling Black Holes. This artist's conception shows two merging black holes similar to those detected by LIGO. The black holes—which will ultimately spiral together into one larger black hole—are shown orbiting one another in a plane. They are spinning in a non-aligned fashion, which means they have different orientations relative to the overall orbital motion of the pair. There is a hint of this phenomenon found by LIGO in at least one black hole of the GW170104 black-hole system. Credit: LIGO/Caltech/MIT/Sonoma State (Aurore Simonnet

Penn State LIGO physicists are members of the LIGO-Virgo collaboration to detect and characterize gravitational waves. The collaboration now is completing a very exciting Second Observing Run that is drawing to a close on August 25, 2017.

The Virgo and LIGO Scientific Collaborations have been searching for gravitational-wave signals since November 30, 2016. In the second Advanced Detector Observing Run 'O2,' both LIGO and Virgo instruments have been operating together since August 1, 2017.

The collaboration has issued the following statement: "Some promising gravitational-wave candidates have been identified by both LIGO and Virgo during our preliminary analysis, and we have shared what we currently know with observing partners using telescopes, gamma-ray detectors, and . We are working hard to assure that the candidates are valid gravitational-wave events, and it will require time to establish the level of confidence needed to bring any results to the scientific community and the greater public. We will let you know when we have information ready to share."

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anadish
not rated yet Sep 22, 2017
There might be some astronomical observation of gravitational waves produced by neutron stars; although, I think, this time it is quite improbable, looking at the sheer fortuitousness of the so-called detection makes it untenable -- the VIRGO run was too short (just 25 days), LIGO never found any orbiting neutron stars' gravitational waves in the last 3 years, while there are too many neutron stars nearby to have slipped LIGO's notice. Let me tell you, LIGO actually never detected any black hole mergers in the past too. The least I can say is that the reported mergers were a result of the intense imagination of the LIGO folks, to say the least. And now to slip in the final secret -- Speed of gravity is infinite while LIGO shows it to be equal to the speed of light in its so-called observations. That is why all the gravitational wave observations by LIGO are false.
wolfgangwengelhardt
not rated yet Oct 01, 2017
I fully agree with this comment: "...all the gravitational wave observations by LIGO are false."

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