Survey examines pubic hair grooming-related injuries

Pubic hair grooming is a widespread practice and about a quarter of people who groom reported grooming-related injuries in a national survey, according to a new article published by JAMA Dermatology.

A better understanding of how may lead to injury is warranted because of the high prevalence of pubic grooming.

Benjamin N. Breyer, M.D., M.A.S., of the University of California, San Francisco, and coauthors conducted a web-based designed to be representative of the U.S. population to collect data on grooming behavior.

Of the 7,570 men and women who completed the survey, 5,674 of 7,456 (76.1 percent) reported a history of grooming. Grooming-related injury was reported by 1,430 groomers, a weighted prevalence of 25.6 percent, according to the results.

Laceration (a cut) was the most common reported injury followed by burns and rashes. There were 79 injuries among the 5,674 groomers (1.4 percent) that required medical attention, the authors note. For both men and women, the frequency of grooming and the degree of grooming, such as removing all pubic hair multiple times, were risk factors associated with injury.

Limitations of the study include that some individuals may not have answered the survey truthfully because pubic hair grooming is a sensitive subject.

"This study may contribute to the development of clinical guidelines or recommendations for safe pubic hair removal," the authors conclude.


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Pubic hair grooming common among some US women

More information: Matthew D. Truesdale et al. Prevalence of Pubic Hair Grooming–Related Injuries and Identification of High-Risk Individuals in the United States, JAMA Dermatology (2017). DOI: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2017.2815
Journal information: JAMA Dermatology

Citation: Survey examines pubic hair grooming-related injuries (2017, August 16) retrieved 19 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-survey-pubic-hair-grooming-related-injuries.html
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What about a study comparing the medical benefits of grooming versa not doing it? The result would be the encouragement of (careful) shaving. And by the way, why is this article listed under "Plants & Animals" :-) OK, I understand, because of the bugs loving this hairy space.

Aug 19, 2017
Wow, sounds like some people watch too much pr0n on teh Internetz. If you need medical attention after you cut off your pubic hair

U iz doin it rong

Just sayin'.

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