Managers can help prevent employees from working while sick

August 9, 2017, Wiley

A new study indicates that managerial support can help prevent employees who work extremely hard out of an obsessive drive ('workaholics') from forcing themselves to attend work when feeling sick. Such support from managers can also help address work-family conflict in workaholics.

Increasing the awareness of supervisors of the harmful consequences and costs associated with showing up to work while ill (presenteeism) could allow them to recognise the value of rest and recovery. This could help prevent from feeling unable to cope efficiently with obligations pertaining to work and family.

"Managers should be trained to develop supportive leadership skills that are able to function as a protective factor buffering the detrimental association between an overwhelming compulsion to work and presenteeism," said Dr. Greta Mazzetti, lead author of the International Journal of Psychology study.

Explore further: Work-family conflict linked to verbal abuse

More information: International Journal of Psychology (2017). DOI: 10.1002/ijop.12449

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