Microsoft Paint brushed aside

Microsoft executive Megan Saunders introduces Paint 3D at a Microsoft news conference in 2016 in New York. The original Paint ap
Microsoft executive Megan Saunders introduces Paint 3D at a Microsoft news conference in 2016 in New York. The original Paint application, dating back to 1985, is to be retired, Microsoft said

Microsoft on Monday announced the end of days for its pioneering Paint application as it focuses on software for 3-D drawing.

Paint drawing and that made its debut in 1985 with the Windows operating system was among the applications listed as "removed or deprecated" in a Windows 10 Fall Creators Update set for release later this year.

Features or functions on the list "are not in active development and might be removed in future releases," according to the US .

For decades, Paint was among installed by default on Windows-powered personal computers and drew a strong following.

Fans of the application will be able to take solace in a Paint 3-D version launched early this year.


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Jul 24, 2017
So now any Windows program that depends on Paint being installed (eg. to execute graphics, perhaps using Paint's DLLs) will fail. Windows: reinventing the wheel - and flat tires - since 1985.

Jul 24, 2017
Not to worry. Microsoft has built fault tolerance into Windows. When a process fails it will automatically run a trobleshooter that will search for a solution.

Jul 25, 2017
vacuumforce:
Not to worry. Microsoft has built fault tolerance into Windows. When a process fails it will automatically run a trobleshooter that will search for a solution.


Hahaha - the only part of what you said that's correct is that MS has built tolerance of Windows faults *into Windows users*. The Windows troubleshooter isn't even as insightful as a 12 year old with 6 months Windows experience. And it doesn't do any good with broken APIs like I mentioned. There's no solution for it to find. Even a 12 year old would just switch to Mac or Linux.

Steve Ballmer, is that you?

Jul 25, 2017
"When a process fails it will automatically run a trobleshooter that will search for a solution." So, it will scan for the nearest bootable Linux DVD?

Jul 25, 2017
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Jul 25, 2017
So now any Windows program that depends on Paint being installed (eg. to execute graphics, perhaps using Paint's DLLs) will fail.

Just because the app is deprecated doesn't mean the DLL will be removed. There's plenty of legacy DLLs on windows systems. It just means it won't be developed any further.

Jul 25, 2017
So now any Windows program that depends on Paint being installed (eg. to execute graphics, perhaps using Paint's DLLs) will fail. Windows: reinventing the wheel - and flat tires - since 1985.


Can you actually name -any- application that would actually use Paint's DLLs?

And what you're really describing is called "dependency hell" - and it's worse on the other side of the fence. Suppose you're running Ubuntu with Gnome and you find a Ubuntu compatible binary of a program - but alas it's for KDE. To make it run you have to download and install an entire other desktop environment which you will never use, but you still have to waste the memory on it.

"Compile it yourself" is something no user should have to do.

Jul 25, 2017
antialias_physorg:
Just because the app is deprecated doesn't mean the DLL will be removed. There's plenty of legacy DLLs on windows systems. It just means it won't be developed any further


Maybe Windows will keep the DLLs. Or maybe it won't. That's the beauty of Windows: who knows? Microsoft breaks things all the time, and deprecating the app means its DLLs are more subject to bit rot.

Jul 25, 2017
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Jul 25, 2017
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Jul 25, 2017
Eikka:
Can you actually name -any- application that would actually use Paint's DLLs?


I can't name any, but that doesn't mean there aren't hundreds of them that use Paint's DLLs, developed over the past 32 years. That are no longer supported, but are still in use, because until now they "just work". Since Paint was included in every single version of the OS.

And what you're really describing is called "dependency hell" - and it's worse on the other side of the fence.


No, dependency hell is when the dependencies are not automatically satisfied by running an installer once. Your GNOME/KDE scenario is easily handled when installing the program, automatically if you use APT, which everyone does. It's APT that's enabled Linux to take over the server and as Android the mass consumer market.

It just consumes a little more HD storage, not "memory". HD storage costs $0.03 per GB, available in TBs; even KDE is only a couple-few hundred MB in size, so $0.01 - negligible.

Aug 05, 2017
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