Juno spacecraft to fly over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10

July 2, 2017, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
This true color mosaic of Jupiter was constructed from images taken by the narrow angle camera onboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft on December 29, 2000, during its closest approach to the giant planet at a distance of approximately 10 million kilometers (6.2 million miles). Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Just days after celebrating its first anniversary in Jupiter orbit, NASA's Juno spacecraft will fly directly over Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the gas giant's iconic, 10,000-mile-wide (16,000-kilometer-wide) storm. This will be humanity's first up-close and personal view of the gigantic feature—a storm monitored since 1830 and possibly existing for more than 350 years.

"Jupiter's mysterious Great Red Spot is probably the best-known feature of Jupiter," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "This monumental storm has raged on the solar system's biggest planet for centuries. Now, Juno and her cloud-penetrating science instruments will dive in to see how deep the roots of this storm go, and help us understand how this giant storm works and what makes it so special."

The data collection of the Great Red Spot is part of Juno's sixth science flyby over Jupiter's mysterious . Perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter's center) will be on Monday, July 10, at 6:55 p.m. PDT (9:55 p.m. EDT). At the time of perijove, Juno will be about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the planet's cloud tops. Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno will have covered another 24,713 miles (39,771 kilometers) and will be directly above the coiling crimson cloud tops of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The spacecraft will pass about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers) above the Giant Red Spot . All eight of the spacecraft's instruments as well as its imager, JunoCam, will be on during the flyby.

On July 4 at 7:30 p.m. PDT (10:30 p.m. EDT), Juno will have logged exactly one year in Jupiter orbit. At the time, the spacecraft will have chalked up about 71 million miles (114.5 million kilometers) in orbit around the giant planet.

"The success of science collection at Jupiter is a testament to the dedication, creativity and technical abilities of the NASA-Juno team," said Rick Nybakken, project manager for Juno from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "Each new orbit brings us closer to the heart of Jupiter's radiation belt, but so far the spacecraft has weathered the of electrons surrounding Jupiter better than we could have ever imagined."

Juno launched on Aug. 5, 2011, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. During its mission of exploration, Juno soars low over the planet's cloud tops—as close as about 2,100 miles (3,400 kilometers). During these flybys, Juno is probing beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and studying its auroras to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Early science results from NASA's Juno mission portray the largest planet in our solar system as a turbulent world, with an intriguingly complex interior structure, energetic polar aurora, and huge polar cyclones.

Explore further: Juno spacecraft set for fifth Jupiter flyby

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flat_earth
1 / 5 (13) Jul 02, 2017
There is no evidence no scientific proof that earth is a spinning sphere flying through a vacuum outer space. The self evident truth is earth is flat and motionless. There is no outer space.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (12) Jul 02, 2017
There is no evidence no scientific proof that earth is a spinning sphere flying through a vacuum outer space. The self evident truth is earth is flat and motionless. There is no outer space.

I take it you've never been on an airplane at 30k ft...

Honestly. Where do you people come from...?
More importantly - why do you even bother?
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (10) Jul 02, 2017
The self evident truth is earth is flat and motionless.

Funny how no one ever falls over the edge, isn't it (or how there's not even any imges of the edge)? Or who keep flying west (or east) end up where they started. not to mention satellite images - what are those? Fake?

Heck, you could even build your own focault pendulum in your living room and see that the Earth isn't flat and that it is spinning...for a lot less time it takes you to post your insane drivel, here, too.

In your own words: It is self evident that you're utterly insane.
cantdrive85
1.4 / 5 (9) Jul 02, 2017
Just days after celebrating its first anniversary in Jupiter orbit, NASA's Juno spacecraft will fly directly over Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the gas giant's iconic, 10,000-mile-wide storm.

And they will likely measure an equally great electric current feeding the storm.
Whydening Gyre
4.6 / 5 (9) Jul 02, 2017
The self evident truth is earth is flat and motionless.

Funny how no one ever falls over the edge, isn't it (or how there's not even any imges of the edge)? Or who keep flying west (or east) end up where they started. not to mention satellite images - what are those? Fake?

Heck, you could even build your own focault pendulum in your living room and see that the Earth isn't flat and that it is spinning...for a lot less time it takes you to post your insane drivel, here, too.

In your own words: It is self evident that you're utterly insane.

Or an attention troll...
Whydening Gyre
3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 02, 2017
Just days after celebrating its first anniversary in Jupiter orbit, NASA's Juno spacecraft will fly directly over Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the gas giant's iconic, 10,000-mile-wide storm.

And they will likely measure an equally great electric current feeding the storm.

Hi volt - low current.
Not enough to drive the storm - on it's own...
cantdrive85
1.8 / 5 (5) Jul 02, 2017
Not enough to drive the storm - on it's own...

And you know this with any level of certainty due to what?
nkalanaga
4.7 / 5 (6) Jul 02, 2017
From Wikipedia's entry on Io:
"Io plays a significant role in shaping Jupiter's magnetic field, acting as an electric generator that can develop 400,000 volts across itself and create an electric current of 3 million amperes, releasing ions that give Jupiter a magnetic field inflated to more than twice the size it would otherwise have."

There's plenty of voltage and current, but the circuit goes through Jupiter's magnetic poles, not the Great Red Spot.

The GRB may be partly an electrical phenomenon, but I suspect that if it is, the current is closer to Jupiter's core, creating a hot spot in the lower atmosphere. But I have no evidence of THAT, either.

That's why Juno's looking!
jonesdave
5 / 5 (5) Jul 02, 2017
And they will likely measure an equally great electric current feeding the storm.


Really? Evidence to back this up, please. Or a link to the hypothesis. Preferably by somebody qualified in the relevant area.
jonesdave
5 / 5 (5) Jul 02, 2017
The GRB may be partly an electrical phenomenon, but I suspect that if it is, the current is closer to Jupiter's core, creating a hot spot in the lower atmosphere. But I have no evidence of THAT, either.


Actually, the spot is cooler in IR than its surroundings. From Wiki, referencing:
https://books.goo...;f=false
Whydening Gyre
not rated yet Jul 02, 2017
Not enough to drive the storm - on it's own...

And you know this with any level of certainty due to what?

Same way your certain that it is - AND - Numerous years working WITH hi V, Low C.
Considering the denseness of Jupiter clouds, there may be sufficient current (via resistance) to generate SMALLer storms (and even possibly drive), but doubtful something of the Great Spot's magnitude. And they wouldn't last all that long.
It's primarily gravity and wind pressure that generated it and keeps it alive.
Altho I will give that there might be some electromagnetic activity, It's more a product than a driver. There just isn't enuff conductive elements to produce sufficient current to spin that "motor".
Shootist
5 / 5 (3) Jul 02, 2017
Turtles, I tell you, turtles all the way down.
nkalanaga
5 / 5 (4) Jul 02, 2017
Jonesdave: Thank you! If that's the case, it's unlikely to be electrically driven, as any such effects should produce considerable heat.

Shootist: A very large Jovian turtle, forcing the winds to go around the shell, resulting in a persistent eddy? I've heard less likely theories...

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