Juno mission prepares for December 11 Jupiter flyby

NASA Juno Mission Prepares for December 11 Jupiter Flyby
This artist's rendering shows NASA's Juno spacecraft making one of its close passes over Jupiter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

On Sunday, December 11, at 9:04 a.m. PST (12:04 p.m. EST, 17:04 UTC) NASA's Juno spacecraft will make its third science flyby of Jupiter.

At the time of closest approach (called perijove), Juno will be about 2,580 miles (4,150 kilometers) above the gas giant's roiling cloud tops and traveling at a speed of about 129,000 mph (57.8 kilometers per second) relative to the planet. Seven of Juno's eight science instruments will be energized and collecting data during the flyby.

"This will be the first time we are planning to operate the full Juno capability to investigate Jupiter's interior structure via its gravity field," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "We are looking forward to what Jupiter's gravity may reveal about the 's past and its future."

Mission managers have decided not to collect data with the Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) instrument during the December flyby, to allow the team to complete an update to the software that processes JIRAM's science data. A software patch allowing JIRAM's operation is expected to be available prior to the next perijove pass (PJ4) on Feb. 2, 2017.

The spacecraft team continues to weigh its options regarding modifications of Juno's —how long it takes for the spacecraft to complete one orbit around Jupiter. At present, Juno's orbital period is 53.4 days. There had been plans to perform a period adjustment maneuver with the spacecraft's main engine on Oct. 19 to reduce the orbital period to 14 days. The team made the decision to forgo the maneuver in order to further study the performance of a set of valves that are part of the spacecraft's fuel pressurization system. The period reduction maneuver was the final scheduled burn of Juno's .

"We have a healthy spacecraft that is performing its mission admirably," said Rick Nybakken, project manager for Juno from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "What we do not want to do is add any unnecessary risk, so we are moving forward carefully."

In collaboration with NASA and the Juno team, Apple will release an interactive guide to the mission (an iBook) on Dec. 11.

The Juno spacecraft launched on Aug. 5, 2011, from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrived at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. During its mission of exploration, Juno soars low over the planet's cloud tops—as close as about 2,600 miles (4,100 kilometers). During these flybys, Juno will probe beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and study its auroras to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Juno's name comes from Roman mythology. The mythical god Jupiter drew a veil of clouds around himself to hide his mischief, and his wife—the goddess Juno—was able to peer through the clouds and reveal Jupiter's true nature.


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Dec 10, 2016
How come authors in PHYS.org are so eager to mention snippets from Roman mythology and mythical gods and goddesses?

But when it comes to any mention of a real God in these comments, people cry foul, and comments are tagged for reporting, and character assassination takes place?

Dec 10, 2016
What would you expect? Academia today is filled with heathens,
atheists and Anti-Christs. They marvel at the creation but
HATE the creator. The answers they are looking for, are not to be
found where they are looking. The solar system today is as it was
put there..Migrating planets? ..Please spare us simpletons your theories!

Dec 10, 2016
How come authors in PHYS.org are so eager to mention snippets from Roman mythology and mythical gods and goddesses?

Probably because it is part of our popculture, just as the christianity mythology. Whether it be Roman, Greek, Egyptian, or Christian, all mythology and religions worship the planets and stars as their gods/god, regardless of what they believe.

Dec 10, 2016
How come authors in PHYS.org are so eager to mention snippets from Roman mythology and mythical gods and goddesses?
Uh, because they are apropos to the topic?
During these flybys, Juno will probe beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter...
The mythical god Jupiter drew a veil of clouds around himself to hide his mischief, and his wife—the goddess Juno—was able to peer through the clouds and reveal Jupiter's true nature.
Solar system objects are named for mythological beings, continuing a tradition from ancient times. This mission is extremely well named BY NASA, as the article merely adds as a footnote to the content about the exploration that is to take place. This is certainly no endorsement of gods nobody believes in any more. (See definition of "mythical".)

Dec 10, 2016
But when it comes to any mention of a real God in these comments, people cry foul, and comments are tagged for reporting, and character assassination takes place?
Posting a religious assertion in a science site comment section will raise the hackles of many and some will respond inappropriately.
What would you expect? Academia today is filled with heathens, atheists and Anti-Christs. They HATE the creator.
Non-believers don't believe - there is nothing TO hate.
The answers they are looking for, are not to be found where they are looking. The solar system today is as it was put there..Migrating planets? ..Please spare us simpletons your theories!
A religious religious assertion based on ancient texts, not modern exploration and evidence. Yes, please spare us, this is a science site.

Dec 11, 2016
Carbon, Non-believers obviously don't believe. That is why they hate everything that might infinge on their thinking. That is why many of them hate Christians. That is why they are intolerant. Because they never learned what true tolerance and love is.

Dec 11, 2016
But when it comes to any mention of a real God in these comments, people cry foul,

Of course. Because it has nothing to do with science.
and comments are tagged for reporting,

Of course, Because it's against the comment section guidelines. That's what the 'report' feature is FOR in case you don't know: To tag people who break the rules set down by the creators of this site (who are gracious enough to provide these comment sections). if you want to piss all over their gift by breaking their rules then why the hell you would be surprised that people take umbrage is beyond me.
and character assassination takes place?

You can't "character assasinate" anyone who mentions gods in a science forum. They've already comitted the ultimate character suicide.

RNP
Dec 11, 2016
@Bart_A
Carbon, Non-believers obviously don't believe. That is why they hate everything that might infinge on their thinking. That is why many of them hate Christians. That is why they are intolerant. Because they never learned what true tolerance and love is.


And posts like this are how you demonstrate your Christian tolerance and love?


Dec 11, 2016
Perhaps Bart has confused the words "hate" and "pity".

Dec 12, 2016
Comment sections should have a sign saying "There are trolls here". That would explain much about biting others.

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