NASA's Juno successfully completes Jupiter flyby

NASA's Juno successfully completes Jupiter flyby
upiter's north polar region is coming into view as NASA's Juno spacecraft approaches the giant planet. This view of Jupiter was taken on August 27, when Juno was 437,000 miles (703,000 kilometers) away. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

NASA's Juno mission successfully executed its first of 36 orbital flybys of Jupiter today. The time of closest approach with the gas-giant world was 6:44 a.m. PDT (9:44 a.m. EDT, 13:44 UTC) when Juno passed about 2,600 miles (4,200 kilometers) above Jupiter's swirling clouds. At the time, Juno was traveling at 130,000 mph (208,000 kilometers per hour) with respect to the planet. This flyby was the closest Juno will get to Jupiter during its prime mission.

"Early post-flyby telemetry indicates that everything worked as planned and Juno is firing on all cylinders," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

There are 35 more close flybys of Jupiter planned during Juno's mission (scheduled to end in February 2018). The August 27 flyby was the first time Juno had its entire suite of science instruments activated and looking at the giant planet as the spacecraft zoomed past.

"We are getting some intriguing early data returns as we speak," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "It will take days for all the science data collected during the flyby to be downlinked and even more to begin to comprehend what Juno and Jupiter are trying to tell us."

While results from the spacecraft's suite of instruments will be released down the road, a handful of images from Juno's visible light imager—JunoCam—are expected to be released the next couple of weeks. Those images will include the highest-resolution views of the Jovian atmosphere and the first glimpse of Jupiter's north and south poles.

"We are in an orbit nobody has ever been in before, and these give us a whole new perspective on this gas-giant world," said Bolton.


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Aug 29, 2016
One thing that will become clear is that Jupiter could not have "formed" by itself out of a cloud of gas/dust. And that it cannot really be billions of years old. But then again, evolutionists will find a story to cover those eventualities.

Aug 29, 2016
Dear Fred Jose,

While we all appreciate new & old ideas & there is such thing as freedom o speech, please refrain from attacking people that believe in actual scientific evidence and do not take the words written 2,000 years ago as the unquestionable truth.
Using religion to attack scientific evidence sounds like the old Inquisition or like ISIS of modern day. thanks.

Aug 29, 2016
Going back to the article, i can barely wait for the photographs taken by the JunoCam & the load of scientific data & new discoveries about the formation of Jupiter & the solar system.

This kind of results are to be expected whenever NASA scientific programs get fundind for the projects that can actually bring new scientific knowledge instead of the corporate-subsidies ones chosen by the US senate (Space Shuttle, SLS, etc.).

Aug 30, 2016
One thing that will become clear is that Jupiter could not have "formed" by itself out of a cloud of gas/dust. And that it cannot really be billions of years old.
...and we'll get that proof by finally photographing the elusive 'Made in Taiwan' sticker on the southern pole.

Aug 30, 2016
This comment has been removed by a moderator.

Aug 30, 2016
But then again, evolutionists will find a story to cover those eventualities.

aaand Jupiter has...what again to do with evolution? At least you're in an asylum with an internet connection. Can't nobody claim people like you aren't well taken care of.

instead of the corporate-subsidies ones chosen by the US senate (Space Shuttle, SLS, etc.).

Well, the senate only funds stuff directly that has direct or indirect military value.

RNP
Aug 31, 2016
@bscott

You have "evidence" that Jupiter is billions of years old eh? Or do you mean that according to our best guess based on how we think things work, Jupiter is billions of years old...point being, a theory is not evidence of anything.]


Of course there is evidence, the theory you are damning is supported by boatloads of evidence, you have just never bothered to look at it. I therefore refer you to the scientific literature.

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