Berlin orders recall of 22,000 Porsches over emissions cheating (Update)

This picture taken on March 9, 2016 shows new Porsche Cayenne at the Porsche factory in Leipzig
This picture taken on March 9, 2016 shows new Porsche Cayenne at the Porsche factory in Leipzig

Germany on Thursday ordered luxury car brand Porsche to recall 22,000 vehicles across Europe over emissions test cheating amid a widening election-year scandal.

Transport Minister Alexander Dobrindt told reporters that "illegal" software disguising the true level of polluting emissions had been discovered in Porsche's Cayenne and Macan models, which must now be fixed.

"We will order a legally binding recall for these vehicles, just as we have in other cases," he said.

Dobrindt said that because the affected models are still being manufactured, Berlin would also deny any permits for the vehicles "until new software is available".

Porsche is a subsidiary of Volkswagen, which admitted in 2015 to cheating regulatory emissions tests in 11 million diesel vehicles worldwide.

Prosecutors in the southwestern city of Stuttgart, a bastion of Germany's all-important car industry, had said earlier this month they had opened a probe against persons unknown working for Porsche.

The investigation into "suspicion of fraud and false advertising" stems from "possible manipulation of exhaust treatment in diesel vehicles from Porsche AG".

Porsche spokesman Christian Weiss told AFP at the time that the company "takes the prosecutors' investigation very seriously" and would "do the utmost to clear up the issue comprehensively and as quickly as possible".

Volkswagen, the world's largest carmaker, has admitted to using so-called "defeat device" software to cheat regulatory nitrogen oxides emissions tests.

The devices allowed the cars to spew up to 40 times the permissible limits of nitrogen oxide during normal driving, but this was hidden during emissions testing.

The issue has gained fresh urgency less than two months before Germany holds a general election in which Chancellor Angela Merkel, a champion of the auto industry, is widely expected to win a fourth term.


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Jul 27, 2017
Are any car makers honest? Can't think of any at the moment.

Jul 28, 2017
Are any car makers honest? Can't think of any at the moment.


No. They're all cheating because of the conflicting requirements of extreme fuel economy, low emissions, and low price.

If the governments would relax fuel economy demands, they'd get cleaner engines, but they can't because they're addicted to high fuel taxes, so they're playing the game of "blame the auto industry" - with a conspiracy theory that the automakers could do better cars but simply choose not to.

As the governments are/were buying votes by pretending they can actually mandate all three - economy, emissions, and price - they upheld the conflicting regulations and taxes, and the automakers responded by cheating - and they could keep on cheating for so long because the governments didn't want to catch them.

After all, the German government doesn't really want to punish VW for cheating, because they want VW to remain competitive over Renault, and vice versa for the French.


Jul 28, 2017
Well Said Eikka. I was thinking that since this is becoming a pattern of cheating car makers, there must be something unattainable about the emissions standards. . . . . . .

Jul 29, 2017
Well Said Eikka. I was thinking that since this is becoming a pattern of cheating car makers, there must be something unattainable about the emissions standards. . . . . . .


Efficiency in an internal combustion engine is directly related to the combustion temperature and pressure, both of which reduce the energy treshold for forming nitrogen oxides and increases the probability of that particular chemical reaction happening.

With high fuel taxes driving the market towards low fuel consumption - the price of a gallon of fuel in the EU consists of 65-85% tax - simultaenously with high safety requirements that prevent cars from getting smaller and lighter, and the addition of CO2/km emissions regulations which result in financial penalties if not met, the manufacturers simply have no other option but to cheat.

The demands have risen faster than the technology can accomodate.

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