Image: James Webb Telescope tested in thermal vacuum chamber

June 1, 2017 by Rob Gutro, NASA
Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn

NASA's Johnson Space Center's "Chamber A" in Houston is an enormous thermal vacuum testing chamber and now appears to be opening it's "mouth" to take in NASA's James Webb Space Telescope for testing.

The telescope and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are two of the three major elements that comprise the Webb telescope Observatory flight system and are being lifted into the chamber in this photo. The other is the Spacecraft Element (spacecraft bus and sunshield), which is currently under construction at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in Redondo Beach, California.

The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. It will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, ESA (European Space Agency) and the Canadian Space Agency.

Explore further: James Webb Space Telescope arrives at NASA's Johnson Space Center

More information: For more information about the Webb telescope visit: www.jwst.nasa.gov or www.nasa.gov/webb

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