Astronomers find black hole in Sagittarius constellation

April 28, 2017
Sagittarius region of milky way. Credit: Wikipedia

An international team of astronomers led The University of Manchester have found evidence of a new 'missing-link' black hole in the Milky Way galaxy, hidden in the Sagittarius constellation.

The black hole is located approximately 26,000 light years, or 7.9 Kiloparsecs (kpc), from Earth in a globular cluster called, NGC 6624. A globular cluster is a gravitationally bound swarm of millions of old stars occupying regions that are just a few light years across.

The team, led by Dr Benetge Perera, have found evidence that the millisecond (PSR B1820-30A) – a pulsar is highly magnetized, rapidly rotating neutron star that emits a beam of electromagnetic radiation – in NGC 6624 is most likely orbiting around an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) located at the cluster's centre. The mass of black hole is so big, it is the equivalent to weight of 7,500 of our suns.

PSR B1820 30A is the closest-known pulsar to the centre of any globular and it is the first pulsar to be found orbiting a black hole. The detection of IMBHs is extremely important as they can help astronomers understand the 'missing link' between stellar mass (SMBH), the smallest kind, and (SMBH), which are the largest.

Dr Perera, from the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics in the University's School of Physics and Astronomy, explains: "High stellar densities towards the centre of globular clusters provide a likely environment for the formation of massive black holes. The detection of IMBHs is important for understanding the missing link between the different kinds of black holes.

"It is generally thought that they could be formed by the direct collapse of very massive primordial stars or successive mergers of stellar-mass black holes and runaway collisions in dense young star clusters."

The pulsar was discovered using the Lovell Telescope, based at Jodrell Bank, in 1990. Since then the team has analysed more than 25 years of observations from PSR B1820- 30A made with the telescope. In addition to Jodrell Bank, the analysis included data obtained using the Nançay Radio Telescope in France.

Professor Andrew Lyne, also from the School of Physics and Astronomy, explains the importance of discovering such pulsars: "Pulsars like PSR B1820 30A act as fantastically accurate clocks and allow us to determine precisely their distance from the Earth in the same way that global positioning satellites work. The pulsar is therefore very sensitive to any motion arising from the gravity of other nearby massive objects, such as black holes, making it easier for us to detect them."

Dr Perera added: "We have determined the orbital parameters and the companion mass of PSR B1820-30A from the motion measured through pulsar timing. Simply put, this means our results are consistent with the pulsar being in orbit around a central intermediate-mass black hole.

"This discovery provides important input to our understanding of how and the clusters themselves form and evolve."

Explore further: A black hole in a low mass X-ray binary

Related Stories

A black hole in a low mass X-ray binary

April 24, 2017

A globular cluster is a roughly spherical ensemble of stars (as many as several million) that are gravitationally bound together, and typically located in the outer regions of galaxies. Low mass X-ray binary stars (LMXBs) ...

Hubble views an old and mysterious cluster

November 14, 2013

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the best ever image of the globular cluster Messier 15, a gathering of very old stars that orbits the centre of the Milky Way. This glittering cluster contains over 100 000 ...

Star Cluster Holds Midweight Black Hole, VLA Indicates

May 28, 2007

Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have greatly strengthened the case that supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies may have formed through mergers of smaller ...

New research reveals hundreds of undiscovered black holes

September 7, 2016

New research by the University of Surrey published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society has shone light on a globular cluster of stars that could host several hundred black holes, a phenomenon ...

Recommended for you

Camera on NASA's Lunar Orbiter survived 2014 meteoroid hit

May 26, 2017

On Oct. 13, 2014 something very strange happened to the camera aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC), which normally produces beautifully clear images of the lunar ...

SDO sees partial eclipse in space

May 26, 2017

On May 25, 2017, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, saw a partial solar eclipse in space when it caught the moon passing in front of the sun. The lunar transit lasted almost an hour, between 2:24 and 3:17 p.m. EDT, ...

Collapsing star gives birth to a black hole

May 25, 2017

Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole. It took the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), and NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to go looking for remnants ...

12 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (12) Apr 28, 2017
The mass of black hole is so big, it is the equivalent to weight of 7,500 of our suns.

Just to put this into perspective: The diameter of the event horizon of this sucker is merely 44000 kilometers
physicsBuff
not rated yet Apr 28, 2017
from gas compressing into largw balls creating these super massive black holes in the dark ages.
Tuxford
1 / 5 (11) Apr 28, 2017
in NGC 6624 is most likely orbiting around an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) located at the cluster's centre. The mass of black hole is so big, it is the equivalent to weight of 7,500 of our suns.


As I predicted would happen in 2012. See my comments links thereunder for details.

https://phys.org/...tml#nRlv

antialias_physorg
4.7 / 5 (15) Apr 28, 2017

As I predicted would happen in 2012.

Erm...no? You just said "there's black hole there" on an article that said "there's a black hole there". That takes real brains, that, Einstein.

I think you need to look up what the word 'predicting' means.
Benni
1.4 / 5 (10) Apr 28, 2017
The diameter of the event horizon of this sucker is merely 44000 kilometers
.....no it isn't 44k, here's why: http://www.cscamm...hild.pdf

The essential result of this investigation is a clear understanding as to why the "Schwarzschild singularities" do not exist in physical reality. Although the theory given here treats only clusters whose particles move along circular paths it does not seem to be subject to reasonable doubt that mote general cases will have analogous results. The "Schwarzschild singularity" does not appear for the reason that matter cannot be concentrated arbitrarily. And this is due to the fact that otherwise the constituting particles would reach the velocity of light.

The problem quite naturally leads to the question, answered by this paper in the negative, as to whether physical models are capable of exhibiting such a singularity.

RealityCheck
3 / 5 (8) Apr 28, 2017
@antialias_physorg.

As I predicted would happen in 2012.

Erm...no? You just said "there's black hole there" on an article that said "there's a black hole there". That takes real brains, that, Einstein.

I think you need to look up what the word 'predicting' means.
Please correct me if I'm wrong, antialias, but that article linked in Tuxford's above post is dated feb 2017 !!

Whereas Tuxford's 'prediction' came in an article in Feb 2012 !! as he stated in his above post.

And even that 'prediction' in 2012 was based on the LaViolette SQK model (regarding which I make no comment either way here) that Tuxford has been basing his views/predictions on for decades now.

Perhaps, then antialias, you could clarify/correct your above criticism to reflect that posting/prediction 'timeline' of Tuxford's---unless of course I missed something which your above comment was based on? Thanks.

Tuxford
2.2 / 5 (10) Apr 28, 2017
Thanks @Reality,
Anitiguy is likely NSA sympathizer, so best to ignore him. Or he is otherwise lost in intellectual egomania, never to find his way back. In any case, thanks for correcting the record, as my comment there-under of Feb 15, 2012 reads:

'And now young blue stars found around an intermediate class core mother star. So this completes the scenario outlined. Likely an intermediate size core star lies in each globular cluster, inspiring the growth of the nearby stars into massive blue giants. But if the core star is supermassive, then likely the young stars are mostly destroyed before they reach the blue giant stage.'

Of coarse, I don't accept that black holes are completely black, preferring to label them as core stars instead. I suspect they will turn out to be rather gray.
Benni
1.9 / 5 (9) Apr 28, 2017
Of coarse, I don't accept that black holes are completely black, preferring to label them as core stars instead. I suspect they will turn out to be rather gray.


Tux, I hope you'll take some time to read Einstein's 1939 paper for which I provided a link.

It isn't necessary to follow the rigors of the math, but it is incontrovertible rebuttal to narratives asstrophysicists create in trying to tag Einstein's GR as a source for the structure of BHs. I think a lot of casual readers to this site think Einstein's GR is the source of BH theory, so the question that should come to their minds if this be the case, why would Einstein author this 1939 paper?

Everytime I ask someone, like Anti-Physics or Schneibo, to quote the section of GR which they claim provides the hypotheses for the creation of BHs, they never respond or they go on a name calling binge. Let's just see how well they do this time?
Benni
1.8 / 5 (5) Apr 29, 2017
The diameter of the event horizon of this sucker is merely 44000 kilometers


.....no it isn't 44k, here's why: http://www.cscamm...hild.pdf


And already these five think they are smarter than Einstein:

Astronomers find black hole in Sagittarius constellation April 28, 2017, 4:37 pm 1 yyz Ojorf Captain Stumpy ThomasQuinn mrbeardy13

.......and they wonder why I challenge their math skills.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (4) Apr 30, 2017
I doubt there are any unicorns at the center of that globular cluster.
Benni
1.8 / 5 (5) Apr 30, 2017
I doubt there are any unicorns at the center of that globular cluster.


...........for sure nothing with infinite density & gravity as Einstein states there can never be.
Captain Stumpy
not rated yet May 07, 2017
and they wonder why I challenge their math skills
@benjiTROLL the idiot illiterate
1- i don't wonder about you at all
2- considering you've proven yourself to be completely inept at even basic math, and i can prove it, this is almost hysterically funny!

were you attempting to make a joke or just projecting?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.