Key experiment at world's biggest atom smasher gets upgrade

March 2, 2017
In this undated picture publicly provided by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, employees and scientists prepare the upgrading of one of the four main experiments on the world's biggest atom smasher in the hope it will help them discover previously unknown particles or physical properties at CERN near Geneva. Officials at CERN, said the operations the equivalent of a "heart transplant" for the CMS experiment. CMS was key to confirming the existence of the Higgs boson particle in 2012. (CERN via AP)

Scientists are upgrading one of the four main experiments on the world's biggest atom smasher in hopes it will help them discover previously unknown particles or physical properties.

Officials at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, say the operation Thursday is the equivalent of a "heart transplant" for the CMS experiment. CMS was key to confirming the existence of the Higgs boson particle in 2012.

The new, U.S.-built pixel detector is used to track particles as they hurtle through the 27-kilometer (17-mile) Large Hadron Collider beneath the Swiss-French border.

CERN spokesman Arnaud Marsollier likened the $17-million detector to a huge 3D-camera capable of capturing 120 million pixels at 40 million frames a second.

It replaces an older device that recorded about 68 million pixels.

Explore further: Famed atom smasher gets twice the energy next year (Update)

Related Stories

LHC to narrow search for Higgs boson

December 8, 2011

Scientists at the world's largest atom smasher have new data that shows with greater certainty where to find a long-sought theoretical particle that would help explain the origins of the universe.

Recommended for you

ATLAS experiment observes light scattering off light

March 20, 2019

Light-by-light scattering is a very rare phenomenon in which two photons interact, producing another pair of photons. This process was among the earliest predictions of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the quantum theory of ...

How heavy elements come about in the universe

March 19, 2019

Heavy elements are produced during stellar explosion or on the surfaces of neutron stars through the capture of hydrogen nuclei (protons). This occurs at extremely high temperatures, but at relatively low energies. An international ...

Trembling aspen leaves could save future Mars rovers

March 18, 2019

Researchers at the University of Warwick have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even ...

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields

March 15, 2019

A new way of measuring atomic-scale magnetic fields with great precision, not only up and down but sideways as well, has been developed by researchers at MIT. The new tool could be useful in applications as diverse as mapping ...

3 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

geekusprimus
not rated yet Mar 04, 2017
It seems to me that CERN is trying to prove supersymmetry, which is starting to look like the modern day luminiferous aether.
rrrander
not rated yet Mar 06, 2017
CERN seems to have hit a wall since Higgs.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Mar 06, 2017
CERN seems to have hit a wall since Higgs.

Erm...no?
Check out all the experiments going ot. There's interesting stuff being discovered all the time.
https://home.cern...eriments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.