Video: Kip Thorne talks about the years leading up to LIGO's first detection of gravitational waves

February 15, 2017, California Institute of Technology

In a new video, Kip Thorne, Caltech's Richard P. Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus, talks about the years leading up to LIGO's first detection of gravitational waves.

He talks about how a small research team, its big vision, and decades of unwavering support opened a new window to the universe.

Credit: California Institute of Technology

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