California Institute of Technology

The California Institute of Technology or Caltech is a private institution governed by a Board of Trustees. Caltech began as Throop College of Technology in 1891. Under the direction of Nobel Prize physicist Robert Andrews Millikan and the newly formed Research Council, Caltech was created in 1921. In subsequent years Caltech has emerged as a highly focused institution of learning. Annually, Caltech accepts less than 2200 exceptionally gifted undergraduate and graduate students for enrollment. The core curriculum is divided into six categories; Division of Biology, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Division of Geological and Planetary Science, Division of Humanities and Social Sciences, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy. Caltech operates (manages) The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, The Mount Wilson Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope and other endeavors .Caltech was home to Murray Gell-Mann and Richard Feynman and 31 Nobel Laureates, 49 U.S. Medal of Science recipients and 10 National Medal of Technology recipients. Caltech is accepted world-wide as an institute of scientific and academic excellence.

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Why we need erasable MRI scans

Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a widely used medical tool for taking pictures of the insides of our body. One way to make MRI scans easier to read is through the use of contrast agents—magnetic dyes injected into ...

dateApr 25, 2018 in Analytical Chemistry
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Taking MRI technology down to micrometer scales

Millions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are performed each year to diagnose health conditions and perform biomedical research. The different tissues in our bodies react to magnetic fields in varied ways, allowing ...

dateMar 19, 2018 in General Physics
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A better way to model stellar explosions

Neutron stars consist of the densest form of matter known: a neutron star the size of Los Angeles can weigh twice as much as our sun. Astrophysicists don't fully understand how matter behaves under these crushing densities, ...

dateMar 05, 2018 in General Physics
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