Did the LIGO gravitational waves originate from primordial black holes?

July 27, 2016
Binary black holes recently discovered by the LIGO-Virgo collaboration could be primordial entities that formed just after the Big Bang.Primordial black hole binaries were discussed extensively in the 1990s; however, interest in them waned when observations implied that their number was limited. To date, no one has found any primordial black holes, possibly making the LIGO-Virgo observations the first of their kind. Credit: Kyoto University

Binary black holes recently discovered by the LIGO-Virgo collaboration could be primordial entities that formed just after the Big Bang, report Japanese astrophysicists.

If further data support this observation, it could mark the first confirmed finding of a primordial black hole, guiding theories about the beginnings of the .

In February, the LIGO-Virgo collaboration announced the first successful detection of .

"The detected gravitational waves were created from a merger of two black holes thirty times the mass of the Sun. It's extremely rare for such massive black holes to form in the present-day universe," says study author Takahiro Tanaka of Kyoto University.

"After this announcement, many astrophysicists started considering how such heavy black holes were created, and how such black hole binaries were formed."

As a starting point, the team hypothesized that —formed following the Big Bang—were distributed randomly in space.

"The universe was extremely hot and dense when it was first born. Primordial black holes came into being when gravitational collapse happened in regions which were especially dense," explains Tanaka. "They have a completely different origin from black holes that form from celestial bodies."

Based on general relativity, the research team evaluated how often black holes merge in the present epoch. They found that the LIGO-Virgo team's on merger frequencies would fall in to place if the binaries were primordial, and if they constitute a thousandth of all dark matter in the universe.

Primordial black hole binaries were discussed extensively in the 1990s; however, interest in them waned when observations implied that their number was limited. To date, no one has found any primordial black holes, possibly making the LIGO-Virgo observations the first of their kind.

"Theoretical models about the beginnings of the universe are still hotly contested. Some models necessarily predict the existence of primordial , so their discovery could help unlock important clues about the universe's early days," says Tanaka.

"When enough observational data related to black hole binaries has accumulated, it will become possible to confirm whether these are truly primordial."

Explore further: Did gravitational wave detector find dark matter?

More information: The paper "Primordial black hole scenario for the gravitational wave event GW150914" will appear 28 July 2016 in Physical Review Letters.

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ursiny33
1 / 5 (4) Jul 27, 2016
Thats insane thinking, you would need super massive objects made of hydrogen atom based mass to construct that in the primordial age, in you model get real , that CCM are quantum particle magnetically bound plasma of electrons and positrons, made from super massive stars , and now your claiming that primordial black holes were invented before stars, what are you smoking Maui volcanic weed
Reg Mundy
1 / 5 (3) Jul 28, 2016
That's if what they detected were really GW.
I don't think so. I believe they detected perturbations in time, as per https://www.amazo...1HLDY978
Zzzzzzzz
5 / 5 (3) Jul 28, 2016
Reg Mundy...... you BELIEVE. And that is your undoing.
ursiny33
1 / 5 (2) Jul 28, 2016
The black hole believers, think light can't escape from them , all photons in the light spectrum are anti gravity constructions , gravity has no power over photons
Reg Mundy
1 / 5 (2) Jul 28, 2016
Reg Mundy...... you BELIEVE. And that is your undoing.

Yeah, badly chosen word.
Perhaps I should have said "Weighing up all the evidence, and considering the failure to find DM and the obvious discrepancies between results predicted by gravitational theory and observed phenomena, then I am forced to conclude that the laws of gravity are wrong, gravity does not exist as a force, and expansion theory is correct. Therefore, LIGO did not detect GW but something else, which could be verification of Expansion Theory as I stated" and so on, but I just couldn't be bothered with all that typing.......
ursiny33
1 / 5 (2) Jul 28, 2016
In alleged gravitational lensing , gravity is bending space not light , its following a path of space it hits a static charged halo of hydrogen atoms encompassing the galaxy and rides over that charge

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