Hubble sees spiral in Andromeda

February 10, 2017, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
The Andromeda constellation is one of the 88 modern constellations and should not be confused with our neighboring Andromeda Galaxy. The Andromeda constellation is home to the pictured galaxy known as NGC 7640. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

The Andromeda constellation is one of the 88 modern constellations and should not be confused with our neighboring Andromeda Galaxy. The Andromeda constellation is home to the pictured galaxy known as NGC 7640.

Many different classifications are used to identify galaxies by shape and structure—NGC 7640 is a barred spiral type. These are recognizable by their , which fan out not from a circular core, but from an elongated bar cutting through the galaxy's center. Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is also a barred . NGC 7640 might not look much like a spiral in this image, but this is due to the orientation of the galaxy with respect to Earth—or to Hubble, which acted as photographer in this case! We often do not see galaxies face on, which can make features such as spiral arms less obvious.

There is evidence that NGC 7640 has experienced some kind of interaction in its past. Galaxies contain vast amounts of mass, and therefore affect one another via gravity. Sometimes these interactions can be mild, and sometimes hugely dramatic, with two or more colliding and merging into a new, bigger galaxy. Understanding the history of a galaxy, and what interactions it has experienced, helps astronomers to improve their understanding of how —and the stars within them—form.

Explore further: Image: Hubble spotlight on irregular galaxy IC 3583

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FredJose
1.6 / 5 (14) Feb 10, 2017
Understanding the history of a galaxy, and what interactions it has experienced, helps astronomers to improve their understanding of how galaxies—and the stars within them—form.

Actually, it does not help at all. They are just as dumbfounded as always because they simply cannot let go of the requirement that stars "form" all by themselves out of a cloud of gas. Doing so would basically mean the end of their careers - for all the wrong reasons.
Benni
1 / 5 (11) Feb 10, 2017
NGC 7640 is a barred spiral type. These are recognizable by their spiral arms, which fan out not from a circular core, but from an elongated bar cutting through the galaxy's center.


.........but don't tell Jonesy the birk this, he thinks Spiral Galaxies don't have Radial Arms......Right Jonesy?

Read more at: https://phys.org/...html#jCp
RNP
4.1 / 5 (10) Feb 11, 2017
@Benni
.........but don't tell Jonesy the birk this, he thinks Spiral Galaxies don't have Radial Arms......Right Jonesy?

You can't even get THIS right? It was I that told you that there are no such things as "radial arms" in spiral galaxies, not jonesdave.

To repeat the point I made before, although in some sense radial, bars are NOT arms. I again challenge you to find ANY reference, other than your own posts, that refer to them as "radial arms". You can even read on the Wikpedia page below why radial arms CAN NOT exist in a spiral galaxy.

https://en.wikipe...l_galaxy

You should note that trying to taunt people with their failure to acknowledge incorrect physics only serves to make YOU look silly, particularly when you address your taunts to the wrong person.

BTW. To cap your post off, the link you supply above connects to THIS page, not our previous discussion which is here: https://phys.org/...ups.html
jonesdave
4 / 5 (8) Feb 11, 2017
NGC 7640 is a barred spiral type. These are recognizable by their spiral arms, which fan out not from a circular core, but from an elongated bar cutting through the galaxy's center.


.........but don't tell Jonesy the birk this, he thinks Spiral Galaxies don't have Radial Arms......Right Jonesy?

Read more at: https://phys.org/...html#jCp


Benni? ****er off, you plank.
humy
3.7 / 5 (13) Feb 11, 2017
Understanding the history of a galaxy, and what interactions it has experienced, helps astronomers to improve their understanding of how galaxies—and the stars within them—form.

Actually, it does not help at all. They are just as dumbfounded as always because they simply cannot let go of the requirement that stars "form" all by themselves out of a cloud of gas..

FredJose

What a complete moron you are.
They aren't "dumbfounded" because it is no mystery to them or us how clouds of gas collapse to a smaller volume to form stars;
The cause of such collapses is known to be something called "gravity", you moron.
Do you deny there is gravity?
Benni
1 / 5 (12) Feb 11, 2017
You can't even get THIS right? It was I that told you that there are no such things as "radial arms" in spiral galaxies, not jonesdave.
.....Oh? You too? So both of you made that mistake.

Just goes to show what can happen when a Journalist & a Birk get together to come up with more excuses for their collective ineptness.

jonesdave
3.9 / 5 (8) Feb 11, 2017
You can't even get THIS right? It was I that told you that there are no such things as "radial arms" in spiral galaxies, not jonesdave.
.....Oh? You too? So both of you made that mistake.

Just goes to show what can happen when a Journalist & a Birk get together to come up with more excuses for their collective ineptness.



No, s**t for brains. I never said anything about it. Understand?
Benni
1 / 5 (11) Feb 11, 2017
No, s**t for brains. I never said anything about it. Understand?
.........Prove it.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (9) Feb 11, 2017
He'll "prove it" by name calling, vulgarities, and wilful ignorance. It's what jonesdumb does....
SlartiBartfast
4.2 / 5 (6) Feb 11, 2017
No, s**t for brains. I never said anything about it. Understand?
.........Prove it.


Prove you never said anything about being sexually attracted to farm animals.
Bart_A
4.5 / 5 (8) Feb 11, 2017
Please, all of you, grow up and start acting like and writing like adults. You are the shame of phys.org.

TheGhostofOtto1923
2.3 / 5 (3) Feb 12, 2017
Please, all of you, grow up and start acting like and writing like adults. You are the shame of phys.org
Yes because adults believe in god and are thus civil, and decent, and composed.

You WILL get a whupping when you die, just keep that in mind wont you?

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