Hubble looks at stunning spiral

July 13, 2015
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Flickr user C. Claude

This little-known galaxy, officially named J04542829-6625280, but most often referred to as LEDA 89996, is a classic example of a spiral galaxy. The galaxy is much like our own galaxy, the Milky Way.

The disk-shaped galaxy is seen face on, revealing the winding structure of the . Dark patches in these spiral arms are in fact dust and gas—the raw materials for new stars.

The many young stars that form in these regions make the spiral arms appear bright and bluish.

The galaxy sits in a vibrant area of the night sky within the constellation of Dorado (The Swordfish), and appears very close to the Large Magellanic Cloud —one of the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way.

The observations were carried out with the high resolution channel of Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys.

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Returners
1 / 5 (3) Jul 13, 2015
I bet there's no Dark Matter in that galaxy either; Just like there's no Dark Matter in the Milky Way.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (2) Jul 14, 2015
I bet there's no Dark Matter in that galaxy either; Just like there's no Dark Matter in the Milky Way.

Just like there is no DM anywhere...
docile
Jul 14, 2015
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JeanTate
1 / 5 (1) Jul 14, 2015
@Returners, cd: I bet you're both wrong ;-)

@docile:
Every galaxy contains some dark matter - do you see the yellow center of the above spiral? It's just because the dark matter is there - it prohibits the formation of new stars, despite of high density of interstellar gas
Interesting ... do you have any primary sources where I can read more about this?
docile
Jul 14, 2015
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JeanTate
5 / 5 (2) Jul 14, 2015
@docile:
For example http://www.nasa.g...ter.html
Thanks! (I note, however, that neither of these are primary sources)

The NASA release seems to be in error: "appearing in the journal Nature, online on Feb. 16 and in the Feb. 24 print edition" - not only is there no paper like this, in Feb, but there are no "Feb. 16" or "Feb. 24" editions! Further, there is no paper with Cooray as author, in 2015, on this topic (that I could find; maybe you will have better luck?)

The other one is based on Davies+ (2015) (link in PO article); however, this is behind a paywall and I can't find anything on arXiv; however, from the abstract alone it seems highly unlikely that this paper is consistent with your interpretation.

Over-enthusiastic imagination again, perchance?
docile
Jul 14, 2015
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docile
Jul 14, 2015
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