Hubble looks at stunning spiral

Hubble looks at stunning spiral
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Flickr user C. Claude

This little-known galaxy, officially named J04542829-6625280, but most often referred to as LEDA 89996, is a classic example of a spiral galaxy. The galaxy is much like our own galaxy, the Milky Way.

The disk-shaped galaxy is seen face on, revealing the winding structure of the . Dark patches in these spiral arms are in fact dust and gas—the raw materials for new stars.

The many young stars that form in these regions make the spiral arms appear bright and bluish.

The galaxy sits in a vibrant area of the night sky within the constellation of Dorado (The Swordfish), and appears very close to the Large Magellanic Cloud —one of the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way.

The observations were carried out with the high resolution channel of Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys.


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Hubble eyes a loose spiral galaxy

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Citation: Hubble looks at stunning spiral (2015, July 13) retrieved 25 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-hubble-stunning-spiral.html
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Jul 13, 2015
I bet there's no Dark Matter in that galaxy either; Just like there's no Dark Matter in the Milky Way.

Jul 14, 2015
I bet there's no Dark Matter in that galaxy either; Just like there's no Dark Matter in the Milky Way.

Just like there is no DM anywhere...

Jul 14, 2015
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Jul 14, 2015
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Jul 14, 2015
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Jul 14, 2015
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