Image: Hubble eyes galactic refurbishment

Image: Hubble eyes galactic refurbishment
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Luca Limatola

The smudge of stars at the center of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a galaxy known as UGC 5797. UGC 5797 is an emission line galaxy, meaning that it is currently undergoing active star formation. The result is a stellar population that is constantly being refurbished as massive bright blue stars form. Galaxies with prolific star formation are not only veiled in a blue tint, but are key to the continuation of a stellar cycle.

In this image UGC 5797 appears in front of a background of spiral galaxies. Spiral galaxies have copious amounts of dust and gas—the main ingredient for stars—and therefore often also belong to the class of emission line galaxies.

Spiral galaxies have disk-like shapes that drastically vary in appearance depending on the angle at which they are observed. The collection of spiral galaxies in this frame exhibits this attribute acutely: Some are viewed face-on, revealing the structure of the , while the two in the bottom left are seen edge-on, appearing as plain streaks in the sky. There are many spiral galaxies, with varying colors and at different angles, sprinkled across this image—just take a look.


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Citation: Image: Hubble eyes galactic refurbishment (2015, May 4) retrieved 23 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-05-image-hubble-eyes-galactic-refurbishment.html
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May 04, 2015
And merger maniacs, where are the nearby galactic colliders that are supposed to have triggered all this active star formation???

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