Hubbles spies the beautiful galaxy IC 335

December 24, 2014
Credit: ESA/Hubble and NASA

This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the galaxy IC 335 in front of a backdrop of distant galaxies. IC 335 is part of a galaxy group containing three other galaxies, and located in the Fornax Galaxy Cluster 60 million light-years away.

As seen in this image, the disk of IC 335 appears edge-on from the vantage point of Earth. This makes it harder for astronomers to classify it, as most of the characteristics of a galaxy's morphology—the arms of a spiral or the bar across the center—are only visible on its face. Still, the 45 000 light-year-long galaxy could be classified as an S0 type.

These lenticular are an intermediate state in galaxy morphological classification schemes between true spiral and elliptical galaxies. They have a thin stellar disk and a bulge, like spiral galaxies, but in contrast to typical spiral galaxies they have used up most of the interstellar medium. Only a few new stars can be created out of the material that is left and the is very low. Hence, the population of stars in S0 galaxies consists mainly of aging stars, very similar to the star population in elliptical galaxies.

As S0 galaxies have only ill-defined spiral arms they are easily mistaken for elliptical galaxies if they are seen inclined face-on or edge-on as IC 335 here. And indeed, despite the morphological differences between S0 and elliptical class galaxies, they share some common characteristics, like typical sizes and spectral features.

Both classes are also deemed "early-type" galaxies, because they are evolving passively. However, while may be passively evolving when we observe them, they have usually had violent interactions with other galaxies in their past. In contrast, S0 galaxies are either aging and fading spiral galaxies, which never had any interactions with other galaxies, or they are the aging result of a single merger between two spiral galaxies in the past. The exact nature of these galaxies is still a matter of debate.

Explore further: Hubble paints a spattering of blue in irregular galaxy IC 559

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16 comments

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Top Taciturn
not rated yet Dec 24, 2014
Are Spiral galaxies right handed or left handed, clock-wise or counter?
Shootist
5 / 5 (1) Dec 24, 2014
Are Spiral galaxies right handed or left handed, clock-wise or counter?


what is your frame of reference?
viko_mx
1 / 5 (3) Dec 26, 2014
@ Top Taciturn

Both variants are existing, but why is this so a big bang theorists is difficult to answer.
Steve 200mph Cruiz
5 / 5 (6) Dec 28, 2014
Viko,
No it's not, our current understand of physics can readily create galactic structures.

Some current problems are the lack of dwarf galaxies and we don't completely know the formation processes of super massive black holes. But those are not arguments against the big bang, that's just the frontier of human knowledge, nobody knows for absolute certain yet.
I Have Questions
1 / 5 (4) Dec 29, 2014
All spiral galaxies are right handed.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (7) Dec 29, 2014
Galaxies will follow the right hand rule, whether they are R or L from our frame of reference depends upon which way the electric Birkeland current powering the galaxy is flowing.
Vietvet
4.6 / 5 (9) Dec 29, 2014
Galaxies will follow the right hand rule, whether they are R or L from our frame of reference depends upon which way the electric Birkeland current powering the galaxy is flowing.


LMAO!
TechnoCreed
5 / 5 (7) Dec 29, 2014
Are Spiral galaxies right handed or left handed, clock-wise or counter?

All spiral galaxies are right handed.

If 'You Have Questions' try not to give answer. Because when you pull them out of your hat it is BS. For TT here is the answer: http://phys.org/n...ies.html
Steve 200mph Cruiz
5 / 5 (7) Dec 29, 2014
Cantdrive,

How have you managed to be on this website for so long and still not figured that directionality is meaningless in space?

But what do you expect from a "who knows if science is real? hurrrr" climate denier

Quit pulling stuff out of your bum and acting like it's equal to the knowledge of someone who actually knows what they're talking about and LISTEN
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (4) Dec 29, 2014
How have you managed to be on this website for so long and still not figured that directionality is meaningless in space?


That's why I mentioned "our frame of reference", recall most big bangers and expansionists believe we reside at the center of the Universe. The right hand rule is not meaningless in regards to current flow.
I Have Questions
1 / 5 (1) Dec 29, 2014
Are Spiral galaxies right handed or left handed, clock-wise or counter?

All spiral galaxies are right handed.

If 'You Have Questions' try not to give answer. Because when you pull them out of your hat it is BS. For TT here is the answer: http://phys.org/n...ies.html

Well excuse me for being joking.
OZGuy
5 / 5 (6) Dec 29, 2014
"recall most big bangers and expansionists believe we reside at the center of the Universe"

Bullsh!t
"There is no centre of the universe! According to the standard theories of cosmology, the universe started with a "Big Bang" about 14 thousand million years ago and has been expanding ever since. Yet there is no centre to the expansion; it is the same everywhere. The Big Bang should not be visualised as an ordinary explosion. The universe is not expanding out from a centre into space; rather, the whole universe is expanding and it is doing so equally at all places, as far as we can tell.
In 1929 Edwin Hubble announced that he had measured the speed of galaxies at different distances from us, and had discovered that the farther they were, the faster they were receding. This might suggest that we are at the centre of the expanding universe, but in fact if the universe is expanding uniformly according to Hubble's law, then it will appear to do so from any vantage point."
OZGuy
5 / 5 (4) Dec 29, 2014
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (5) Dec 29, 2014
In 1929 Edwin Hubble announced that he had measured the speed of galaxies at different distances from us, and had discovered that the farther they were, the faster they were receding. This might suggest that we are at the centre of the expanding universe, but in fact if the universe is expanding uniformly according to Hubble's law, then it will appear to do so from any vantage point."


Isn't that handy, another unfalsifiable precept of the scientific creation story. Hubble also stated that a single example of a discordant redshift would be enough to falsify the entirety of the cosmological redshift hypothesis, Halton Arp (a man who worked directly with Hubble and who understood redshift better than almost everyone) found hundreds.

http://www.halton...articles

gkam
1 / 5 (1) Dec 30, 2014
Arp's stuff depended on some unknown factor allegedly affecting redshift, which he could not identify or locate.
OZGuy
5 / 5 (3) Dec 30, 2014
CD
Your link is irrelevant. You stated and I quote, "recall most big bangers and expansionists believe we reside at the center of the Universe".

Big Bang and expansionist proponents do not believe that and therefore, given your claimed extensive knowledge of all things related to physics, you'd know that and deliberately lied.

Why do you pretend to be an expert on physics and all things related to it when it is extremely apparent that you aren't.

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