Hubble gazes into a black hole of puzzling lightness

Hubble gazes into a black hole of puzzling lightness
The beautiful spiral galaxy visible in the center of the image is known as RX J1140.1+0307, a galaxy in the Virgo constellation imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

The beautiful spiral galaxy visible in the center of the image is known as RX J1140.1+0307, a galaxy in the Virgo constellation imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and it presents an interesting puzzle. At first glance, this galaxy appears to be a normal spiral galaxy, much like the Milky Way, but first appearances can be deceptive!

The Milky Way galaxy, like most large galaxies, has a at its center, but some galaxies are centered on lighter, intermediate-mass . RX J1140.1+0307 is such a galaxy—in fact, it is centered on one of the lowest black hole masses known in any luminous galactic core.

What puzzles scientists about this particular galaxy is that the calculations don't add up. With such a relatively low mass for the central black hole, models for the emission from the object cannot explain the observed spectrum.

There must be other mechanisms at play in the interactions between the inner and outer parts of the accretion disk surrounding the black hole. European Space Agency


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Citation: Hubble gazes into a black hole of puzzling lightness (2017, January 13) retrieved 23 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-01-hubble-black-hole-puzzling.html
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RNP
Jan 13, 2017
A related paper on this galaxy can be found here: https://arxiv.org...90v2.pdf

Jan 13, 2017
What puzzles scientists about this particular galaxy is that the calculations don't add up. With such a relatively low mass for the central black hole, models for the emission from the object cannot explain the observed spectrum.

A lesson in real plasma physics would help them out. Unfortunately, something dark will likely be blamed as the culprit.

Jan 13, 2017
What puzzles scientists about this particular galaxy is that the calculations don't add up. With such a relatively low mass for the central black hole, models for the emission from the object cannot explain the observed spectrum.

The central supermassive core star may be in it's periodic unstable state, ejecting a cosmic ray superwave therefrom. But this story is lacking detail to speculate much further.

Jan 15, 2017
A lesson in real plasma physics would help them out. Unfortunately, something dark will likely be blamed as the culprit.

Any Stark effect spectral splitting due to electrical fields has been observed lately?

RNP
Jan 15, 2017
@Gigel
A lesson in real plasma physics would help them out. Unfortunately, something dark will likely be blamed as the culprit.

Any Stark effect spectral splitting due to electrical fields has been observed lately?


LOL. OR Faraday rotation OR Zeeman splitting. One really would have thought that the acolytes of so called "plasma cosmology" would at least understand the basics the plasma physics. But apparently not.

Jan 15, 2017
@nazi sympathizing idiot eu cult member
A lesson in real plasma physics would help them out. Unfortunately, something dark will likely be blamed as the culprit.
1- repeating your lie doesn't make it more true - astrophysicists know plasma physics ( see: www.pppl.gov or http://web.mit.edu/ ) but your engineers who write your eu cult papers do not know astrophysics (see: any pseudoscience link to thunderdolts sites)

2- i'm still waiting for your link to a reputable science journal where you can show where hannes alfven stated "the most energetic solar storms are likely to provide a net cooling and shrinking effect on the upper atmosphere"

you made the claim that alfvie suggested this historically (here: https://phys.org/...oon.html )

so where is the link and reference?

obviously you couldn't find anything reputable because even the MODS deleted your next post...

still waiting

[crickets]

Jan 15, 2017
Schneib's Theorem: science deniers can't count

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