Cutting-edge analytics allows health to be improved through nutrition

February 9, 2017
The new health tool studies the lipid membrane profile. Credit: Elhuyar Fundazioa

The company Lipigenia, which specialises in setting out guidelines on appropriate nutrition to achieve well-being on the basis of state-of-the-art blood analytics, has partnered with AZTI, the Italian enterprise CNR-ISOF and Intermedical Solutions Worldwide. Users will be given access to membrane lipidomics, a new healthcare tool that analyzes the fatty acid profile of the cell membrane.

Lipidomics establishes a direct relationship between food and metabolic alterations stemming from diet. Lipids are one of the main classes of biological molecules that regulate cell metabolism. So membrane lipidomics contributes to the understanding of human metabolism by correlating nutrition with the state of cells to improve health.

The service starts with the taking of a , which is analysed by a processor specifically designed to select mature (120-day-old) red blood cells—these carry full information about our cells. The resulting index reveals the degree of balance/imbalance of the patient, who receives a precision nutrition and supplementation prescription validated within a period of four months.

Finally, Lipigenia draws up the nutrition guidelines to be followed and, if necessary, the required supplementation. This report is available within a period of 15 days after the blood sample has been taken.

Benefits of studying the lipid membrane profile

The study of the profile allows correct eating habits to be established to prevent disease and improve intellectual or physical activities on a day-to-day basis. It also improves the life quality of people with for health such as excess weight, obesity, hypertension or diabetes. It can also be used to delay the imbalances associated with the aging (cognitive deterioration, osteoarthritis, dysphagia, etc.) through guided, personalised, specific nutrition during each phase. It also improves response in the face of a range of disorders such as cardiovascular disease, cancer or Alzheimer's.

Studying the lipid membrane profiles of the population will allow different segments to be characterised in terms of lifestyle, risk factors, chronicity, non-communicable diseases or ageing. That is why one of the main aims of the partnership is to design specific food products and supplements for each of these population segments, thus enabling people to follow a diet suited to their characteristics more easily.

In the future, the researchers seek the development of new profiles in cancer, obesity and , diabetes, Alzheimer's and other conditions.

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