Denmark files charges against Uber over 'illegal' business

Danish prosecutors have filed charges against Uber's European regional hub in the Netherlands with "helping to commit illegalities."

The move comes after a Danish appeals court in November upheld a conviction against an Uber driver, saying he lacked a permit to drive as an occupation and his car was not registered or licensed as a taxi. He was fined 6,000 kroner ($856).

Chief prosecutor Vibeke Thorkil-Jensen said Friday that the ruling established that Uber was an illegal transport service. She said that she now wants to have "the assessment of a court of law" on Uber's broader activities. No date for a trial has been set.

She is filing the against Uber in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, because drivers in Denmark have contracts there.

Uber has been banned in several countries and cities in Europe.

Speaking from Amsterdam, Uber spokesman Daniel Byrne welcomed "the opportunity to clarify our legal position to the prosecutor." He said Uber was "helping create opportunities for 2,000 drivers and their families in Copenhagen."


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Dec 10, 2016
Politicians sure want to control people trying to earn a living, and it appears they get money from taxi cartels to keep out the competition. That's unfortunately means a lot of Danish citizens will not have the freedom to either use these services or to provide them. Why not let a free market exist in taxi service? Every passenger can rate a driver and their car, so they know what they get. They don't get anything like that protection from the government, instead they get higher fares to pay for taxi permits.

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