The exciting new age of quantum computing

October 25, 2016 by Stuart Gillespie, Oxford Science Blog
A new animation for Oxford University looks at the future of quantum computing. Credit: Oxford Science Blog

What does the future hold for computing? Experts at the Networked Quantum Information Technologies Hub (NQIT), based at Oxford University, believe our next great technological leap lies in the development of quantum computing.

Quantum computers could solve problems it takes a conventional computer longer than the lifetime of the universe to solve. This could bring new possibilities, such as advanced drug development, superior military intelligence, greater opportunities for and enhanced encryption security.

Quantum computers also present real risks, but scientists are already working on new forms of encryption that even a quantum computer couldn't crack. Experience tells us that we should think about the applications and implications of quantum computing long before they become reality as we strive to ensure a safe future in the exciting new age of .

A new animation, produced for NQIT by Scriberia, looks at how quantum computing could change our lives. Credit: Oxford Science Blog

Explore further: IBM invites users to test its quantum computer

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