Tesla lays claim to world's fastest production car

Tesla Model S
Tesla Model S

Tesla Motors says a new version of the Model S electric car is the quickest production car in the world from zero to 60 miles per hour.

The company says the Model S P100D sedan can go from stopped to 60 in 2.5 seconds.

The LaFerrari and the Porsche 918 Spyder with gas engines were faster, but they were million-dollar specialty cars that can no longer be bought new, CEO Elon Musk said Tuesday.

The new P100D has a new 100 kilowatt-hour battery pack that extends the car's range to about 315 miles. The top range of the previous Model S was 294 miles. The new battery also is available on the Model X SUV.

Musk says the battery cell chemistry is the same but Tesla had to reconfigure the battery pack to store more energy in the same space and handle increased cooling requirements.

New customers can pay $10,000 for the larger battery pack. Existing owners must pay $20,000 because their existing batteries must be recycled.

The Model S P100D starts at $134,500, while the Model X P100D starts at $135,500. The SUV will be able to go from zero to 60 in 2.9 seconds.


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'Ludicrous Mode'? Tesla adds power to already-fast Model S

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Aug 23, 2016
BMW or Mercedes already called Tesla for their gimmick - the full power launch feature only works once: when the battery is very nearly full. It's not available with a partially discharged battery because the voltage of the battery drops under load and cannot provide the power.

Existing owners must pay $20,000 because their existing batteries must be recycled.


So the scrap value is essentially negative?

Aug 23, 2016
0-60 is a measure of quickness, not a measure of an automobile's speed.

It the Tesla faster than a Bulgatti Veyron at 430.9 km/h (267.7 mph)? No. The Veyron is faster than the Tesla by about 228.5 kp/h or 140 mp/h

KBK
Aug 23, 2016
The reality is that they've claimed a spec that others crow about.

Others make stipulation and conditional aspects on the given criteria that they (others) may crow about.

So they've earned their stripes via the proffered/demanded and accepted criteria, no matter any nigglers and whiners on the subject. :)

The Veryon itself, is a rolling gimmick.

And any car like a Mercedes or whatever than is very fast off the line requires tremendous levels of maintenance to keep it in top trim, so that it may do these given 'tricks'. Tricks that are very stressful on the given car.

In the case of the Tesla, it is probably a case of only needing to top up the battery.

Aug 24, 2016
One Brit company makes the Ariel Atom, a street-legal race car, 500hp in "special trim" and 1200lbs weight. It leaves everything in the dust. About $45,000.

Aug 24, 2016
The reality is that they've claimed a spec that others crow about.


That's a lawyers way of looking at it. Following the letter, not the spirit.

If a manufacturer really wanted to break the record just for the sake of having it, they could add a bracket for a booster rocket to the back of a car and claim it. Of course everyone would instantly recognize it as a hack and a trick.

And any car like a Mercedes or whatever than is very fast off the line requires tremendous levels of maintenance to keep it in top trim, so that it may do these given 'tricks'. Tricks that are very stressful on the given car.

In the case of the Tesla, it is probably a case of only needing to top up the battery.


It does a number on the battery and drivetrain to deliver such high pulse currents, and the other cars can perform launch after launch until the fuel tank is empty, whereas the Tesla does it once and then goes back to the plug. It's hardly the same thing.

Aug 24, 2016
Besides, the whole quest for speed and acceleration is already becoming irrelevant as supercars have reached whatever practical limits there are for driveability. It used to be about pushing technology and the driver, but well before Tesla came on with the "Ludicurous mode" as their only trick, it was already possible to have acceleration and 0-60 times in the 2 second range because the limit wasn't with the engine and drivetrain technology but with traction to the road. You put enough power to the wheels, and you go however fast you like.

Such accelerations are no longer driveable though, and essentially you just push a button, floor the pedal, and the computer does the job. There's no point to it anymore, and no glory in achieving it. It's the supercar syndrome: top speed is about 160 mph and acceleration about 3 seconds for everyone, because nobody can handle them any faster with road-legal tires and comfortable suspension.

So Tesla kinda got too late into the game.

Aug 24, 2016
The reason why the Ludicurous Mode launch is a gimmick and a hack is because the Tesla S is not a sports car or a supercar. It doesn't go around corners, it weighs like an elephant, and it's simply not designed to do lap times or drag race where the launch feature would make a difference. The launch feature itself is built around the fact that electric motors and the inverter can be overdriven many times beyond their specs for a short instant.

It's like a middle-aged accounting manager who for some inexplicable reason has got leg transplants from Usain Bolt so he can run the 100 yard sprint and then immediately die of a heart attack, just to say he can do it.

Tesla should do better, such as improving the fit and finish of the car, improve its efficiency, make it lighter and cheaper etc. but they don't. Instead they improve the one gimmick feature they have from 2.8 seconds to 2.5 seconds because all it needs is bigger fuses for the battery and a software update.

Aug 24, 2016
Tesla's motto-- Shortest, but fastest.

Aug 24, 2016
Does it matter much if the vehicle is no longer available "new"? I mean, does that mean it's no longer available?

There are several vehicles that were or are "quicker", and many more that are "faster".

And there's the 2017 Audi R8 V10, essentially available today, which matches the Tesla down to the tenth-of-a-second, and will out run it given enough road... and go farther, at top speed, without needing a recharge.

Aug 24, 2016
Why the heck all the electric car haters on the web? Has anyone passed a law saying you must drive only electric? Are you worried about getting parts for your Bugatti? BTW, see "The price tag on an oil change & standard service on a Bugatti Veyron? $21,000" US$. -- https://roadtripp...&z=5


I'll stick with my 91 22RE Toyota truck. I could buy at least 2, maybe even 4 of those for that cost. ;)
Can even get over 800HP out of one for that... traction would suck, though.

Aug 25, 2016
Does it matter much if the vehicle is no longer available "new"?

If it's no longer available it's not a production car, now, is it?

I'll stick with my 91 22RE Toyota truck

Yes, and I can buy 4 rubber ducks for the price of one packet of cigarettes. So?

Aug 27, 2016
I like Tesla and what they're trying to do. But they don't make performance cars--not yet, at least.

I'll be impressed if the P100D posts a competitive time on, say, the Nordschleife for example.

Aug 27, 2016
Oh, wow, I have to admit they are already closer than I expected. According to an article in Jalopnik a couple of years ago, a Model S was able to go fairly quickly around the Nurburgring despite its absurd weight. It ran out of power, of course, but these are two areas that will hopefully improve as technology advances thanks to Tesla and others pushing it.

Aug 27, 2016
"The price tag on an oil change & standard service on a Bugatti Veyron? $21,000" US$. -- "
-----------------------------------------------

No oil changes needed for an EV. How much is the Veyron oil filter?

Do they burn low-octane gas?

The comparisons with other cars costing much more and requiring intense and costly maintenance just demonstrate what ordinary Americans can have without the millions of dollars and the requirements for specialized treatment needed for the ICE.

Aug 27, 2016
When you get an EV you will realize the match between load and engine are perfect. Cars need the torque to be correctly applied to the wheels most to start off the line. The electric motors have 100% torque at zero speed. Few sports cars have the response of an EV, and none without great noise and effort.

They can also convert the momentum of the car into force to run the motor as a generator, putting power back into the battery and slowing down the car without using brakes. We run our little e-Golf with little use of the brakes, having close to one-pedal driving. They are perfect for in-town and commute driving.

The best parts are the lack of maintenance and cheap driving. "Gassing up" at home is convenient.

Aug 27, 2016
Many folk do not know when you put a physical load on an electric motor at home or work, the Prime Mover driving the generator miles away feels that physical force on its shaft, as if it were driving the load directly. By electronically changing the fields of an EV motor stator, it can change from one to the other, and slow the car down by charging the battery.

So with regenerative braking, the movement of your foot tells the car how fast to go, while showing you how much you are using or generating. You will learn to love it.

Check that out. The Tesla is good, but...
https://www.youtu...KKxoAvvk

Aug 27, 2016
The Tesla is a practical vehicle which happens to have great acceleration.

Aug 27, 2016
Model S was able to go fairly quickly around the Nurburgring despite its absurd weight. It ran out of power,

It didn't run out of power (Nordschleife is only about 15km long). But the battery gets hot when it discharges at full rate and the electronics scaled back the power output. (Not that racing around a racecourse is any kind of usecase you'd buy such a car for.)
The number of countries where you can, legally, go at such speeds is pretty limited. Even in germany there aren't that many parts of the autobahn where you can go flat out for many kilometers at a stretch (and even when you're allowed to there's always traffic to consider).

Aug 28, 2016
If you're driving down the highway in your Tesla, you'll have the ability to out accelerate just about any other car on the road. Without looking for the right gear, and without spending the extra 10k. That is the only part of this subject that most drivers will ever care about. The value comparisons between internal combustion engine personal vehicles and electric driven personal vehicles is very quickly swinging to the advantage of the electric personal vehicles. All indications are that this current direction will also accelerate. No opinions, arguments, etc.... will have any effect at all on that. As is the case with any number of subjects, deniers have a driving need for validation of their particular delusion.

Aug 28, 2016
ZZZZZ, that will have the first fascination, but it will be the lack of upkeep and maintenance that will win over everybody for good.

Aug 28, 2016
If you're driving down the highway in your Tesla, you'll have the ability to out accelerate just about any other car on the road.

Going down the highway you're already at top allowable speed 99% of the time. So whom are you going to out accelerate?

But I get what Tesla is doing (and I think it's pretty smart). There are many reasons why people want to buy EVs - not just rational considerations like environmental aspects or lifetime costs. Many also want to have a fun car, and if they can have an eco-friendly one then it's all the better. Some want a luxury car but don't want to have people pointing at them as the culprit for pollution and climate change.

Know your clientele...and I think Tesla has done their homework.

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