Meaningful work not created – only destroyed – by bosses, study finds

June 3, 2016 by James Hakner, University of Sussex
Meaningful work not created – only destroyed – by bosses, study finds
Quality of leadership receives virtually no mention when people describe meaningful moments at work, but poor management is the top destroyer of meaningfulness. Credit: istock.com/DragonImages

Bosses play no role in fostering a sense of meaningfulness at work - but they do have the capacity to destroy it and should stay out of the way, new research shows.

The study by researchers at the University of Sussex and the University of Greenwich shows that quality of leadership receives virtually no mention when describe meaningful moments at work, but poor management is the top destroyer of meaningfulness.

Published in MIT Sloan Management Review, the research indicates that, rather than being similar to other work-related attitudes, such as engagement or commitment, meaningfulness at work tends to be intensely personal and individual, and is often revealed to employees as they reflect on their work.

Thus what managers can do to encourage meaningfulness is limited, though what they can do to introduce meaninglessness is unfortunately of far greater capacity.

The study was carried out by Professor Katie Bailey, an employee engagement expert at Sussex's School of Business, Management and Economics, and Dr Adrian Madden of Greenwich's business school.

They interviewed 135 people working in 10 very different occupations, from priests to garbage collectors, to ask about incidents or times when the workers found their work to be meaningful and, conversely, times when they asked themselves, "What's the point of doing this job?"

Professor Bailey says: "In experiencing work as meaningful, we cease to be workers or employees and relate as human beings, reaching out in a bond of common humanity to others.

"For organizations seeking to manage meaningfulness, the ethical and moral responsibility is great, since they are bridging the gap between work and personal life."

The authors identified five qualities of meaningful work:

  • Self-Transcendent. Individuals tend to experience their work as meaningful when it matters to others more than just to themselves. In this way, meaningful work is self-transcendent.
  • Poignant. People often find their work to be full of meaning at moments associated with mixed, uncomfortable, or even painful thoughts and feelings, not just a sense of unalloyed joy and happiness.
  • Episodic. A sense of meaningfulness arises in an episodic rather than a sustained way. It seems that no one can find their work consistently meaningful, but rather that an awareness that work is meaningful arises at peak times that are generative of strong experiences.
  • Reflective. Meaningfulness is rarely experienced in the moment, but rather in retrospect and on reflection when people are able to see their completed work and make connections between their achievements and a wider sense of life meaning.
  • Personal. Work that is meaningful is often understood by people not just in the context of their work but also in the wider context of their experiences.

The researchers also identified the 'seven deadly sins' of meaninglessness: disconnecting people from their values; taking them for granted; handing out pointless work; treating staff unfairly; overriding peoples' better judgment; disconnecting people from supporting relationships; and putting them at risk.

While the challenges of helping employees find meaningful are great, "the benefits for individuals and organizations that accrue from meaningful workplaces can be even greater," the authors write.

Dr Madden adds: "Organizations that succeed in this are more likely to attract, retain, and motivate the employees they need to build sustainably for the future, and to create the kind of workplaces where human beings can thrive."

Explore further: The meaningful life is a road worth traveling

More information: What Makes Work Meaningful—Or Meaningless: http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/what-makes-work-meaningful-or-meaningless/?utm_medium=pr&utm_source=release&utm_campaign=featjune16

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ogg_ogg
not rated yet Jun 03, 2016
What utter rubbish. 135 people? LOL And what was the null hypothesis? That without a boss, they'd be doing more meaningful work? That without a job they'd be doing more meaningful work? Rubbish. Supervision, management, and leadership is necessary for organizations that have to deal with disparate goals. I guess that without bosses, these authors believe that the right work will be done more efficiently? Oh, no - it's about meaningfulness not effectiveness or efficiency. I am happy when I'm doing what I want, and only what I want. Gee, that's definitely a way to structure an economy. Or have they already tried that brand of Communism?
lupus
not rated yet Jun 04, 2016
That certainly was not my experience working for 40 years in engineering and project management. As a manager, I would always brief people as to what was required and why, what the budget was and any time limitations. I found that the very basic fact of being trusted and empowered makes peoples work meaningful. On the other hand, I all too often had to recover situations where a project had gone bad which was typically characterised by people who were angry about mismanagement, felt disempowered, felt they had no authority and hence took no responsibility. My experience is therefore that management is responsible for both meaningfulness and meaninglessness at work.
I have to say that it sounds like this study set out to blame the boss when things were bad but credit the employee when things were good. In other words it sounds like politicised crap.

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