Werner Herzog blasts 'stupid' social media at Sundance

January 26, 2016
German director Werner Herzog, pictured on February 6, 2015, presented the documentary "Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Conn
German director Werner Herzog, pictured on February 6, 2015, presented the documentary "Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World" at the Sundance Film Festival

German filmmaker Werner Herzog on Monday blasted social media as a forum for "stupidity" as he presented his new documentary about the Internet at the Sundance Film Festival.

"What does impress you about 100,000 tweets, 100,000 times stupidities in 140 characters?" the legendary director told reporters when asked about the importance of Twitter and other social media in today's society.

"What is so phenomenal about it?" he asked. "I have never seen a single tweet that I found interesting at all."

He said he hoped "Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World," a 10-part essay that explores the birth of the Internet and its repercussions, would spur people to reexamine their addiction to the Internet and "pay attention to what is going on."

"The Internet is an event that science fiction writers had not foreseen," he said. "Flying cars and colonies in space—but nobody had the Internet on the radar."

Herzog said he developed an aversion to social media and other forms of new technology and at one point did not switch his on for a year.

"What scares me the most? Stupidity," he said, adding that a simple overview of comments on the Internet will uncover "this massive, naked onslaught of stupidity."

He said he has endeavored through the years to maintain his privacy, refusing to attend film events or parties.

"My is my kitchen table," he said. "My wife and I cook and we have four guests maximum because the table doesn't hold more than six."

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Vsdertime
not rated yet Jan 26, 2016
I love the social media comment regarding the kitchen table: him, his wife and 4 friends, because the table only seats 6. Hilarious.
daveremixed
4 / 5 (1) Jan 26, 2016
"The Internet is an event that science fiction writers had not foreseen," he said. "Flying cars and colonies in space—but nobody had the Internet on the radar."

Obviously this guy was not an avid Science Fiction reader, because William Gibson... and basically all the cyberpunk writers of the early 1980's hit the nail on the friggin head.
Chrissypoo
4.5 / 5 (2) Jan 29, 2016
In other news, grumpy old man yells at them young people to stop listening to that loud rock n roll music. Also, complains how when he was young, people had more respect for their elders.

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