ALMA spots monstrous baby galaxies cradled in dark matter

December 4, 2015, National Institutes of Natural Sciences
Example of Monstrous Galaxies. On the left is the image taken at sub-millimeter wavelengths with ASTE. It looks like there is one bright monstrous galaxy. In the center is an image taken at the same sub-millimeter wavelengths, but this time using the new radio telescope facility ALMA. With 60 times better resolution and 10 times better sensitivity, we can see that actually there are 3 monstrous galaxies close together. On the right is the same region photographed in visible light by the Subaru Telescope. We can see that not all of the monstrous galaxies show up in this picture, or at the least that some of them must be very faint. Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), NAOJ, H. Umehata (The University of Tokyo)

Astronomers discovered a nest of monstrous baby galaxies 11.5 billion light-years away using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The young galaxies seem to reside at the junction of gigantic filaments in a web of dark matter. These findings are important for understanding how monstrous galaxies like these are formed and how they evolve in to huge elliptical galaxies.

We are living in a relatively quiet period in the history of the Universe. Ten billion years ago, long before the Sun and Earth were formed, areas of the Universe were inhabited by monstrous galaxies with star formation rates hundreds or thousands of times what we observe today in the Milky Way galaxy. There aren't any monstrous galaxies left in the modern Universe, but astronomers believe that these young galaxies matured into giant elliptical galaxies which are seen in the modern Universe.

Current galaxy formation theories predict that these monstrous galaxies form in special environments where dark matter is concentrated. But up until now it has been difficult to determine the positions of active star forming galaxies with enough precision to actually test this prediction. Part of the problem is that monstrous star-forming galaxies are often obscured in dust, making them difficult to observe in visible light. Dusty galaxies do emit strong radio waves with submillimeter wavelengths, but radio telescopes typically have not had the resolution needed to pin-point individual galaxies.

To search for monstrous galaxies, the research team led by Hideki Umehata (a postdoctoral fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science staying at the European Southern Observatory, Germany), Yoichi Tamura (an assistant professor at the University of Tokyo), and Kotaro Kohno (a professor at the University of Tokyo) used ALMA to make extensive observations of a small part of the sky called SSA22 in the constellation Aquarius (the Water-Bearer).

Monstrous galaxies are thought to preferentiallyalways be born at the centers of the web like structures formed by young galaxies. Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

Before their ALMA observations, the team searched for baby galaxies in SSA22 with ASTE, a 10-m submillimeter telescope operated by NAOJ. While the sensitivity and resolution was not sufficient to be sure, in the ASTE images they could see indications that there might be a cluster of monstrous galaxies. With ten times better sensitivity and 60 times better resolution, ALMA enabled astronomers to pinpoint the locations of nine monstrous galaxies in SSA22.

The team compared the positions of these galaxies with the location of a cluster of young galaxies 11.5 billion light-years from Earth in SSA22 which had been studied in visible light by the Subaru Telescope, operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). The shape of the cluster observed by the Subaru Telescope indicates the presence of a huge 3D web of invisible dark matter. This dark matter filamentary structure is thought to be a progenitor of large scale structures in the Universe. One of the best known examples of large scale structure in the modern Universe is the cosmic Great Wall, a gigantic filamentary structure spanning over 500 million light-years. The in SSA22 could be called a proto-Great Wall.

The team found that their young monstrous galaxies seemed to bewere located right at the intersection of the dark matter filaments. This finding supports the model that monstrous galaxies form in areas where dark matter is concentrated. And since modern large are simply monstrous galaxies which have mellowed with age, they too must have originated at nexuses in the large scale structure.

This result is a very important step for a comprehensive understanding of the relation between the distribution and monstrous galaxies. The team will continue its extensive search for monstrous galaxies to look back even farther into the early history of the Universe to study the evolution of the large scale structure.

Explore further: VISTA pinpoints earliest giant galaxies

More information: This observation result was published as Umehata et al. "ALMA Deep Field in SSA22: A concentration of dusty starbursts in a z=3.09 protocluster core" in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, issued on Dec. 4, 2015. iopscience.iop.org/article/10. … 8/2041-8205/815/1/L8 , arxiv.org/abs/1510.08861

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retarded_genius
2.3 / 5 (25) Dec 04, 2015
..Brought to you by Big Foot, Nessie and the quotient of x/0
Tuxford
1.9 / 5 (17) Dec 04, 2015
The team found that their young monstrous galaxies seemed to bewere located right at the intersection of the dark matter filaments. This finding supports the model that monstrous galaxies form in areas where dark matter is concentrated.


Astronomers are clearly deranged, consumed by dark assumptive nonsense.

Dark matter indications are simply a consequence of concentrated matter, as evidenced by the dark matter halos surrounding galaxies such as the Milky Way. Matter concentrations causes distortions in the surrounding non-existent 'space-time' that diffracts light indicating the presence of dark matter.

It is simply the reverse of the assumptive nonsense.

And more matter concentrated begets more matter, so galaxies form in clusters. I can go on an on, but it won't matter. Astronomers are deranged.

Bongstar420
4.2 / 5 (15) Dec 04, 2015
The team found that their young monstrous galaxies seemed to bewere located right at the intersection of the dark matter filaments. This finding supports the model that monstrous galaxies form in areas where dark matter is concentrated.


Astronomers are clearly deranged, consumed by dark assumptive nonsense.

Dark matter indications are simply a consequence of concentrated matter, as evidenced by the dark matter halos surrounding galaxies such as the Milky Way. Matter concentrations causes distortions in the surrounding non-existent 'space-time' that diffracts light indicating the presence of dark matter.

It is simply the reverse of the assumptive nonsense.

And more matter concentrated begets more matter, so galaxies form in clusters. I can go on an on, but it won't matter. Astronomers are deranged.



Why don't you work as an astronomer then?

Because your ideas are too "correct" for them?
sci512
4 / 5 (12) Dec 05, 2015
Astronomers are clearly deranged, consumed by dark assumptive nonsense.


perhaps dark model models are erroneous... but I think the term "deranged" is far too strong sir... doing mass accounting on a galactic scale is difficult work and errors can be made!

theorizing is not a sign of derangement if you continue to test your theories!

if these theories ultimately prove fruitless then I am confident they will be abandoned in time... aren't you likewise confident? :)
richk
2.5 / 5 (8) Dec 05, 2015
how/did/they/infer/the/existence/ofthe/web/of/dark/matter?is/the/distribution/of/dark/matter/visible/in/the/cmbr?
my2cts
3 / 5 (12) Dec 06, 2015
Astronomers are deranged.

Either they are or you are.
SuperThunder
1.8 / 5 (5) Dec 06, 2015
Is "monstrous" still a technical term outside of 2nd Edition?
Benni
2.5 / 5 (13) Dec 07, 2015
That would depend on how many of the tests give you a negative result that you refuse to accept.
After reading the above article...no. They will continue to assume there is invisible matter out numbering real matter by 4:1. And continue spending billions trying to find it.


Actually, I don't think they want to "find it". Think of the ramifications of that, it means their government funding would dry up & a bunch of theorists in that field of research would get pink slips, they want the issue, not the answer. This is not a field for which there is any great demand, get into Engineering if you want that.
my2cts
2.2 / 5 (10) Dec 07, 2015

And those of us with common sense will continue to point out how rediculous this is and have to deal with ever so faithful supporters of the flawed theory that lead to the DM hypotheseis in the first place.

Common sense is insufficient for the problem at hand, science is needed. You have no evidence disproving DM and no alternative theory.
RealityCheck
1.3 / 5 (6) Dec 07, 2015
Hi guys. :)

From above article:
The shape of the cluster observed by the Subaru Telescope indicates the presence of a huge 3D web of invisible dark matter. This dark matter filamentary structure is thought to be a progenitor of large scale structures in the Universe. One of the best known examples of large scale structure in the modern Universe is the cosmic Great Wall, a gigantic filamentary structure spanning over 500 million light-years. The filamentary structure in SSA22 could be called a proto-Great Wall.
The team found that their young monstrous galaxies seemed to bewere located right at the intersection of the dark matter filaments. This finding supports the model that monstrous galaxies form in areas where dark matter is concentrated.
Whether one subscribes to DM hypothesis or not, I recall a banned member said pretty much the same thing (ie, DM mostly concentrated in filamentary web where observable matter/galaxies are mostly formed)? Or do I miss-remember? :)
Benni
3.1 / 5 (9) Dec 07, 2015
And those of us with common sense will continue to point out how rediculous this is and have to deal with ever so faithful supporters of the flawed theory that lead to the DM hypotheseis in the first place.


Common sense is insufficient for the problem at hand, science is needed. You have no evidence disproving DM and no alternative theory.
.....OK then, we'll start with you..........prove you exist, or if you prefer the inverse alternative, prove you don't.
Benni
2.5 / 5 (8) Dec 07, 2015
This finding supports the model that monstrous galaxies form in areas where dark matter is concentrated.


Whether one subscribes to DM hypothesis or not, I recall a banned member said pretty much the same thing (ie, DM mostly concentrated in filamentary web where observable matter/galaxies are mostly formed)? Or do I miss-remember? :)


RC, the biggest problem Docile was up against was his competition, handle of Axemaster who likes bragging about teaching a physics course at MIT, as it turned out it was 1st semester physics which has nothing to do with nuclear physics, but he was hoping no one would figure that out, I caught him when I did a little data mining to find out who he really was.

You see, Axemaster wasn't about to let Docile upstage him, after all Docile had no MIT affiliation, and Docile was continually preempting material Axemaster considered his personal domain, the Cosmic Fairy Dust narrative of Dark Matter, alias Funny Farm Science.

cantdrive85
3 / 5 (10) Dec 07, 2015

And those of us with common sense will continue to point out how rediculous this is and have to deal with ever so faithful supporters of the flawed theory that lead to the DM hypotheseis in the first place.

Common sense is insufficient for the problem at hand, science is needed. You have no evidence disproving DM and no alternative theory.

Common sense need be the first step, not avoided altogether.
There is billions of dollars wasted and 60+ years of evidence it doesn't exist, it's time to move on.

And quite to the contrary of your claims, there are alternatives and they further eliminate the need to rely on magic fairy dust.

http://www.cosmol...hkin.pdf

http://arxiv.org/...3096.pdf
cantdrive85
3.2 / 5 (9) Dec 08, 2015
Go away little boy, CD85 has twice the grasp of physics you do. This doesn't bode well for you.

Ouch, can't get much more insulting than that zinger!
Tuxford
2.6 / 5 (10) Dec 08, 2015
Here is a clue. See my comments there-under:

http://phys.org/n...ays.html
Tuxford
2.8 / 5 (9) Dec 08, 2015
Nice link Tux, forgot about that one. It's neat how these groundbreaking observations never come up again....when they screw with faith in a model.


Thanks bschott. It felt a bit cold and lonely in those early days. Nice to have a few other credible voices joining in lately.
Benni
3 / 5 (6) Dec 08, 2015
Thanks bschott. It felt a bit cold and lonely in those early days. Nice to have a few other credible voices joining in lately.


...........yeh, it's almost breathtaking that dialogue between individuals can occur on this site less all the name calling & profanity.

I've got a couple of questions for you bshott, but I don't have time right now to think through how I want to ask them. It deals with "particle density" along magnetic fields that you mentioned a couple of posts above, I want you to expand on it. I'm trying to imagine I know where you're going with it, but I'm just not quite there yet & it's already been a long day in the lab.
cantdrive85
2.7 / 5 (7) Dec 08, 2015
How do any of you explain the angular momentum of stars within galaxies being the same from the center of the galaxy to the outer reaches of the galaxy?
Thanks in advance for your limitless wisdom and testable theories.

The galactic disk behaves like a solid plate, Alfven used the Faraday or homopolar motor analogy to describe galaxies. The USS described in the paper I linked above explains how the structure is held together by electrodynamic nanodust which creates skeletal structure in the plasma.

Benni
2.7 / 5 (7) Dec 08, 2015


Thanks bschott. It felt a bit cold and lonely in those early days. Nice to have a few other credible voices joining in lately.


...........yeh, it's almost breathtaking that dialogue between individuals can occur on this site less all the name calling & profanity.


Then of course as you might well expect, the downvoting 1 Star Vote Brigade needs to start showing up, totally clueless as to the material being discussed:

December 8, 2015, 5:52 pm 1 Uncle Ira

Benni
2.7 / 5 (7) Dec 08, 2015
December 8, 2015, 9:01 pm 1 Vietvet

.....and whoa, what have we here but another member of the 1 Star Vote Brigade checking in. Just can't leave science to those who can do it.

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