Researchers conduct first direct measurement of gravity's curvature

January 12, 2015 by Bob Yirka report
Researchers conduct first direct measurement of gravity's curvature
(a) Scheme of the experiment. (b) Gravitational acceleration along the symmetry axis (az) produced by the source masses and the Earth’s gravity gradient. Credit: Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 013001

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers working in Italy has successfully conducted an experiment to directly measure gravity's curvature for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes their work and note that what they have accomplished could lead to an improvement in G, the Newtonian constant of gravity.

Over many years, scientists have developed more sophisticated ways to measure , one of the latest is to use atom interferometry—it enables distance measurement with very high precision and works by exploiting the quantum-mechanical wavelike nature of atoms. Up till now researchers have been able to measure the changes in gravity as altitude increases, for heights as little as a few feet, creating a gradient. In this new research the team has found a way to measure the change in gravity that is produced by a large mass. This change in the gradient is known as gravity's curvature.

To directly measure the change in a gradient, the team used measurements made at three different heights. Measuring gravity at two locations close to one another can give the gradient as the measured difference of the two divided by the distance between them. Measuring gravity at three locations allows for calculating the rate of change, or curvature—an idea for an experiment to carry out this measurement was first proposed back in 2002. The experiment conducted by the team in Italy is based on that proposal.

To allow for measuring gravity at three locations all at the same time, the team created three plumes of at three different heights inside of a one meter pipe. The top half of the piper was surrounded by tungsten alloy weights to cause an increase in variation of the gravitational field. The atoms were irradiated with pulses from a laser to cause them to separate the plumes into two parts, one that absorbed photons and a second that was left in a ground state. The additional momentum caused the atoms in the first group to fall a different distance over a measured time period, which led to a difference in quantum wave cycles that elapsed between the two. The team then added two more wave pulses to cause the two groups to recombine, which allowed them to interfere. Measuring the interference allowed for calculating the variations in gravitational acceleration and curvature, which turned out to be 1.4×10 −5 s −2 m −1, as predicted.

The team believes their method should prove useful for geologic and mapping work as well as improving the measurement of G.

Explore further: Researchers propose method for measuring gravitational impact on antimatter

More information: Measurement of the Gravity-Field Curvature by Atom Interferometry, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 013001 – Published 5 January 2015. dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.013001 . On Arxiv: arxiv.org/abs/1501.01500

ABSTRACT
We present the first direct measurement of the gravity-field curvature based on three conjugated atom interferometers. Three atomic clouds launched in the vertical direction are simultaneously interrogated by the same atom interferometry sequence and used to probe the gravity field at three equally spaced positions. The vertical component of the gravity-field curvature generated by nearby source masses is measured from the difference between adjacent gravity gradient values. Curvature measurements are of interest in geodesy studies and for the validation of gravitational models of the surrounding environment. The possibility of using such a scheme for a new determination of the Newtonian constant of gravity is also discussed.

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movementiseternal
Jan 12, 2015
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Wake
4.4 / 5 (7) Jan 12, 2015
It is interesting that this is a fairly simple method devoid of the multi-million dollar experiments so common in the USA.
Osiris1
4.2 / 5 (5) Jan 12, 2015
Am soooo not gonna go to some unknown website with a really long name. ONE way to get your computer reallllly sick reallllyyyy fast. Now about this article.

This may lead to some gravwell detection instrumentation that can be carried on our future long ranging near intersteller exploration craft that we probably will be building in a decade or two. Just like the jet engine and rocket ship are realities now; but that if discussed in the early 1900's could get a butterfly net thrown over one and johnny be quick too.
gkam
3.7 / 5 (3) Jan 12, 2015
"It is interesting that this is a fairly simple method devoid of the multi-million dollar experiments so common in the USA."
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It is more interesting to see what people choose to notice.
OZGuy
5 / 5 (4) Jan 12, 2015
@Osiris1
The link leads to a page of pseudoscience cr@p
@arom
if I want to discuss vacuum mechanics I'll talk to Dyson(James obviously NOT Freeman).
Ultron
2 / 5 (2) Jan 13, 2015
Maybe Im missing something, but it seems to me a simple measurement of decreasing gravity with increasing height. Where is the specific measurement or prove of gravity curvature?
gculpex
2.3 / 5 (3) Jan 13, 2015
If I'm looking for an apple, I will find an apple. but if I'm looking for an apple and find an orange then I must be looking in the wrong place.
swordsman
1 / 5 (4) Jan 13, 2015
Nonsensical. It is a failure to understand the electromagnetic properties of matter. Just wrap it up in a "quantum" name, and it will play.
mytwocts
1 / 5 (1) Jan 13, 2015
Since curvature and gravitational force are equivalent, the experiment measures gravitational force. Though an improvement of the accuracy of G is newsworthy this is hardly the first observation of gravitational force. This was already observed when the first creatures colonized dry land, a few 100 million years back and may even have been observed billions of years ago by some lifeform on a distant longdestroyed planet.
rah
1 / 5 (2) Jan 18, 2015
Fortunately, with the claim being made by Italian researchers, I was able to save time by not reading the article.
Bob Osaka
not rated yet Jan 19, 2015
Unfortunate that Enrico Fermi and Guglielmo Marconi, not to mention almost all the renaissance greats aren't around to claim a vendetta. Science is science, if independently verified this experiment crosses all imagined, artificial boundaries for the benefit of all mankind.
That said, I heard the Italians were racing to be the first to a black hole because they heard the spaghettification was irresistible.
EnsignFlandry
5 / 5 (2) Jan 19, 2015
There is no curving space at all!

Nucleus of stoms expanding and recycling rxpanding movement / energy which have a nature of expanding light!

Space is eternal and infinity place which is nothing!

Onesimpleprinciple com

EternalRecycling


Its nice to see a well-reasoned scientific assertion with proper references and a mathematical description leading to verifiable predictions.
(Where do these people come from?)

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