Lunadong fossils support theory of earlier dispersal of modern man

Lunadong fossils support theory of earlier dispersal of modern man
Professor Christopher Bae searching for fossils in China.

(Phys.org) —Scientists are now considering the possibility that the exodus of modern man from Africa may have been earlier than 60,000 years ago as traditionally thought. Christopher Bae, a paleoanthropologist at UH Mānoa, and Wei Wang of the Guangxi Museum of Nationalities in Nanning, China, led a team of researchers that discovered two teeth in Lunadong, a cave site located in Guangxi, southern China.

Found in stratified deposits dating between 70,000 and 126,000 years ago, a time period when China was traditionally thought to have been only occupied by more archaic human species, at least one of the can be comfortably assigned to modern Homo sapiens. Dating results of the Lunadong teeth, which include a right upper second molar and a left lower second molar, indicate that the molars may be as old as 126,000 years.

"The findings from the Lunadong study clearly indicate that certain aspects of the Out of Africa model need to be rethought. That is, that there was at least one other earlier Out of Africa migration event that predated 60,000 years ago. This paleoanthropological find, in addition to other recent studies from western and southern Asia, suggest that may have dispersed out of Africa in multiple waves rather than as one major single migration event 60,000 years ago as commonly thought," said Bae.

The Out of Africa theory suggests that modern humans migrated from Africa approximately 60,000 years ago following a southern route along the Arabian Peninsula to Southeast Asia. Recent fossil finds in eastern Asia, including the Lunadong teeth, support the theory of a more complicated dispersal model with migrations not only occurring earlier than originally believed, but also involving later dispersal patterns from Northwest Asia to Europe, and finally into Siberia then the Americas.

Lunadong fossils support theory of earlier dispersal of modern man
Map of Bubing Basin with locations of important cave localities.

Bae has spent the past two decades developing a deeper understanding of the eastern Asian human evolutionary record. He has published extensively on a wide range of topics related to eastern Asian paleoanthropology, with many publications appearing in top tier scientific journals. He has also co-edited Asian Paleoanthropology: From Africa to China and Beyond (2010; Springer) and three special issues of the journal Quaternary International (2010, 2012, 2014).

Lunadong fossils support theory of earlier dispersal of modern man
Various views of the two human teeth from Lunadong: upper (LN0031); lower (LN0030).

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Journal information: Quaternary International

Citation: Lunadong fossils support theory of earlier dispersal of modern man (2014, September 19) retrieved 19 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-09-lunadong-fossils-theory-earlier-dispersal.html
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Sep 19, 2014
even if man were around 60,000 years old in his modern form. that's 2000 generations or more of human beings if you count 30 years a generation . which is a very conservative estimate. as many as 3000 generations at 20 years a generation. and if man is 75,000, 100,000 years old.....and if you count man's existence in africa. at least 200,000 years old in modern form. and up to 2 MILLIION years old in relativley modern form. these numbers are staggering when our history of 'civilization' is but so young and still mostly incomplete.

your family tree is considered impressive if you can trace yourself back 5 generations. most people cannot trace back more than 4 and have a hard time getting anything beyond 3 generations correct. 2 generations is your grandparents. 1 is your parents.

how many people out there don't even know who their father is??
ignorance is bliss? perhaps 'primitive' men were happier in some ways...

Sep 20, 2014
And what about modern women--did they leave a few millennia later? Three letters, nice punchy monosyllable, it may be, but the word "man" refers to only half of people today and at earlier times.

Sep 20, 2014
And what about modern women--did they leave a few millennia later? Three letters, nice punchy monosyllable, it may be, but the word "man" refers to only half of people today and at earlier times.
@Squirrel
Man can also mean the entire human species
https://en.wikipe...ation%29

Man may also mean the entire Human species, its individuals and nearest extinct relatives. See Man (word) for the etymology.


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