A new species of endemic treefrog from Madagascar

August 18, 2014, Pensoft Publishers
This image shows the new tree frog species Boophis ankarafensis. Credit: Gonçalo M. Rosa

A new species of the Boophis rappiodes group is described from the hidden streams of Ankarafa Forest, northwest of Madagascar. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

The new species Boophis ankarafensis is green in colour with bright red speckling across its head and back, but what truly distinguishes this species is a high genetic divergence and different call with a triple click, compared to the usual double.

All individuals were detected from the banks of two streams in Ankarafa Forest. The new species represents the only member of the B. rappiodes group endemic to Madagascar's western coast, with the majority of other members known from the eastern rainforest belt. Despite its conspicuous call, it has not been detected from other surveys of northwest Madagascar and it is likely to be a local endemic to the peninsula.

The ranges of two other also appear restricted to Sahamalaza, and so the area seems to support a high level of endemicity. Although occurring inside a National Park, this is highly threatened by the continuing decline in the quality and extent of its habitat.

This image depicts the breeding activity of the new species Boophis ankarafensis. Credit: Gonçalo M. Rosa

Due to these threats it is proposed that this beautiful should be classified as Critically Endangered according to the IUCN Red List criteria.

This is the habitat of B. ankarafensis in Ankarafa Forest, Madagascar. Credit: Gonçalo M. Rosa

Explore further: Solitary lemurs avoid danger with a little help from the neighbours

More information: Penny SG, Andreone F, Crottini A, Holderied MW, Rakotozafy LS, Schwitzer C, Rosa GM (2014) A new species of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) from the Sahamalaza Peninsula, northwest Madagascar, with acoustic monitoring of its nocturnal calling activity. ZooKeys 435: 111-132. DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.435.7383

Related Stories

Lemurs the world's most threatened mammal: study

July 14, 2012

Lemurs, the furry apes brought to fame by the Disney animation film "Madagascar", are the most endangered mammals on Earth, an International Union for Conservation of Nature conference found.

Finding how many Coquerel's sifaka exist

January 29, 2014

In a study now published in the American Journal of Primatology, Célia Kun-Rodrigues and Jordi Salmona, from Lounès Chikhi's laboratory at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) provide the first abundance estimates ...

Madagascar's palm trees at risk of extinction

October 17, 2012

An environmental group said Wednesday that a vast swath of Madagascar's unique palm tree species was threatened with extinction. Their dying out would harm the livelihoods of local people as well as endanger several animal ...

Recommended for you

Scientists ID another possible threat to orcas: pink salmon

January 19, 2019

Over the years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: ...

Researchers come face to face with huge great white shark

January 18, 2019

Two shark researchers who came face to face with what could be one of the largest great whites ever recorded are using their encounter as an opportunity to push for legislation that would protect sharks in Hawaii.

Why do Hydra end up with just a single head?

January 18, 2019

Often considered immortal, the freshwater Hydra can regenerate any part of its body, a trait discovered by the Geneva naturalist Abraham Trembley nearly 300 years ago. Any fragment of its body containing a few thousands cells ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.